Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection BPE, Framingham, MA

Framingham-ma-cochituate-damTata & Howard completed a Business Practice Evaluation (BPE) for the Town of Framingham, MA.  T&H coordinated and attended a project kick-off meeting with essential Town personnel. The Town provided, as available, documents requested at the Project Kick-off meeting including reports, CIP and operating budgets, organization charts, standard operating procedures, operation and maintenance reports, O&M manuals, performance measures, job descriptions, Emergency Response Plan, procurement process, inventory control, relevant studies and reports, and similar related documents.  These documents were used both for assessment of the current practices and as documentation included in the written plan, as appropriate.  Evaluations determined the adequacy of the documents and current business practices. Documents were compiled and organized electronically for use in the project and future use by the Town.  Any critical missing information was identified and developed by Town staff or included as part of the Implementation Plan.

Business Practice Evaluation (BPE), North Texas Municipal Water District

NTMSD
North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) Wylie Treatment Plant, courtesy of NTMWD

Tata & Howard Provided management consulting and leadership skill building for the North Texas Municipal Water District.  Project included meeting with each of the nine wastewater treatment plant Superintendents and Chief Operators and wastewater collection system management one-on-one as well as meeting with supervisors and managers.  Two briefing workshops were conducted to discuss the findings, overall observations and potential opportunities for improvement that benefits the treatment and collection system facilities.  In addition, a management, operation and maintenance (MOM) workshop was conducted that discussed effective business practices that were compared to industry standards.

 

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Business Practice Evaluation for the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (RWA)

business_hands_notepaper_pensTata & Howard recently completed a Business Practice Evaluation (BPE) for the RWA Field Operations Division. Tata & Howard developed an Effective Practice Guidelines (EPGs)  findings report and recommendations matrix outlining suggested operational and management changes as well as effective practices opportunities for improvement.  Based on results of the field operations assessment, Tata & Howard identified  goals, objectives, activities, and resources necessary to implement  Effective Practice Guidelines for several business practices. Tata & Howard, along with the newly developed RWA EPG team, conducted five workshops with management and field staff responsible for the implementation of the recommended changes to ensure the goals established during the BPE and EPG development were met.

Southern Maine Regional Water Council (SMRWC) Regional System Study

SMRWC graphicv1 - Dist-Flows

Tata & Howard was retained by the Southern Maine Regional Water Council (SMRWC) to complete a Regional System Study for the Portland Water District (PWD), Maine Water Company – Biddeford & Saco (MWCB&S), Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, Wells Water District (KKWWD), Sanford Water District (SWD), South Berwick Water District (SBWD), York Water District (YWD), and Kittery Water District (KWD). The purpose of the study was to provide a detailed update to their 2008 Regional Water System Master Plan Study, which studied possible interconnections between the water systems within the SMRWC.  A combined water distribution system regional hydraulic model was developed using the hydraulic models of each individual water system. The regional hydraulic model was used to evaluate the hydraulic feasibility and impacts of the proposed interconnections as well as the potential of transferring water from northern systems to southern systems through a completely connected and open system.  The PWD and MWCB&S have large water sources and are interested in exploring the option of providing water to southern systems. The study evaluated the needed infrastructure improvements, each system’s available water supply, and demands through the potential and existing interconnections.

The study also examined the effects that the proposed system improvements and interconnections would have on water quality. Not all water systems treat water in the same way; therefore, finished water is unique to the chemicals and treatment techniques used by each system. Specifically, pertinent available data was collected and chemicals used for coagulation, sequestering, primary disinfection, secondary disinfection, corrosion control, pH adjustment, and dental health were reviewed.  Raw and finished water parameters such as turbidity, alkalinity, temperature, pH, and total hardness were also collected.  Of the seven participating water systems in the study, three disinfect with chloramines and four disinfect with only chlorine solution. Operating the systems together as a permanent solution to water supply concerns would require modifications to the treatment processes in some if not all of the systems.  Ideally, each water system involved in water sharing would need to agree to a treatment method to give each system acceptable water quality and eliminate concerns with blending systems.

The identified improvements were based on hydraulic feasibility.  Infrastructure recommendations at the interconnection locations include construction of new water mains, pressure reducing valves, and booster pumping stations.

Regional Intermunicipal Interconnection Evaluation, MA

Northampton interconnection mapThrough a grant from the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, Tata & Howard was retained by the City of Northampton Department of Public Works (Northampton) and the City of Easthampton Water Works (Easthampton) to complete a Regional Intermunicipal Interconnection Evaluation for the Easthampton, Hatfield, Northampton, Southampton, and Williamsburg water systems.  The purpose of the study is to evaluate potential water distribution system intermunicipal connections and emergency water supply.  A combined water distribution system regional hydraulic model was developed and used to evaluate the hydraulic feasibility and impacts of the proposed interconnections.  The study evaluated the needed infrastructure improvements, system available supply and demands, and available supply through the potential interconnections.

Potential interconnection locations between Northampton and Easthampton were considered at four locations, between Northampton and Hatfield, between Northampton and Williamsburg, and between Easthampton and Southampton.  Infrastructure recommendations at the locations include construction of new water mains, meter pits, flow meters, pressure reducing valves (PRV) and portable pumping systems. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) Water Management Act (WMA) permitted and registered pumping volumes for each system’s sources was evaluated for potential supply to other communities.  Northampton and Easthampton have surplus supply, while Hatfield, Williamsburg, and Southampton are approaching their WMA permit or registration allowable withdrawal volumes.

The study determined the following:

  • Three of the four potential interconnection locations between Northampton and Easthampton could be utilized in an emergency by isolating portions of Northampton’s system. An interconnection that could serve all of Northampton would require a pumping system.
  • A pressure reducing valve would be required to supply Hatfield from Northampton and a pumping system would be required to supply Northampton from Hatfield.
  • Due to the location of the Williamsburg interconnection along Northampton’s transmission main route, and the limited amount of water available from Williamsburg, an interconnection from Williamsburg to Northampton is not feasible.

There is an existing hydrant to hydrant interconnection between Easthampton and Southampton that has been utilized to supply water to Southampton during periods of high summer demands. To supply the entire Southampton system, a pumping system would be required, and a PRV would be required to maintain adequate pressures if Southampton were to supply Easthampton.

Water Storage Tank Replacement, Hamden, CT

Whitney Wintergreen tank completed
Tata & Howard provided evaluation, design, construction administration, and resident observation services to the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA) for the replacement of the Whitney-Wintergreen water storage tank. The project included an analysis of SCCRWA’s Whitney-Wintergreen service area to determine the appropriate volume of storage needed to serve its customers, and a 1 million gallon concrete tank was constructed to replace the existing 1.5 million gallon steel tank at the same site. The project also included demolition of the existing tank as well as stormwater management at the site. The project was completed in September of 2015.

 

Maine Water Company Pump Station

MaineWaterCo Barra Road PS building extTata & Howard assisted Maine Water Company with mechanical, structural, and architectural design of a new high service zone booster pump station on Barra Road within the Biddeford-Saco water distribution system. The new pump station replaced the existing Alfred Road station, providing pumping capacity to meet current demands in a majority of the City of Biddeford as well as room for future expansion.  Funding for the project was provided in part by the Maine Drinking Water Program State Revolving Fund (DWSRF).

MaineWAterCo Barra Road PS interiorMechanical design for the project consisted of sizing and selection of three (3) centrifugal booster pumps, associated piping, and appurtenances.  The pumps were sized with input from a hydraulic model of the system developed by Tata & Howard, and they were selected to maximize the available flow from a 16” cast iron pipe line that crosses the Maine Turnpike from the water system’s major storage reservoir.  A pipe gallery was incorporated into the slab and foundation design as well as insulated concrete form (ICF) foundation walls.  Per the Owner’s request, the architectural design used colors and materials similar to the other buildings within the surrounding commercial office park.  Also, a gable roof canopy was added to the design (pictured below) to help shield the emergency backup generator from the elements. Precautions were taken to ensure proper air flow and ventilation was achieved to meet the requirements of the generator.  Construction of the pump station was completed in 2015.

MaineWaterCo Barra Road PS overhang

CHALLENGE: Water Storage Tank Painting, Cleaning in Residential Setting

Chester Street 0.5 million gallon water storage tank in Worcester, MA

CLIENT: City of Worcester, Massachusetts

PROJECT: Chester Street 0.5 million gallon water storage tank painting, cleaning, and rehabilitation

THE CHALLENGE: The Chester Street water storage tank required evaluation, repair, cleaning, and painting of both the interior and the exterior. The tank is located in a heavily populated residential neighborhood and the exterior surface had high levels of lead in the paint. Therefore, special attention to lead contamination, noise, and construction debris was required. In addition, determination of the effects of taking the tank offline were required before any work could be started.

THE SOLUTION:  Analysis of the Super High Service Area using the verified hydraulic model was conducted, and the model was run under extended period simulation (EPS) to evaluate the potential pressure problems within the service area. As a result, operational modifications to the existing pump stations and service zones were recommended. Working only during daylight hours while keeping noise and debris to a bare minimum, construction crews completed miscellaneous repairs including replacing the anchor bolts, installation of overflow support brackets, modification of the access ladder, modification of the roof ladder, repair of the upper level sway rod, extension of the balcony handrail, installation of a roof handrail, and replacement of the roof finial vent. During the exterior abrasive cleaning, a containment system was utilized to prevent lead from getting into the air and soil. Once all repairs and cleaning were completed, the interior and exterior of the elevated tank were painted.

PROGRESS: Two years later, the tank is still in pristine condition, as shown in the photo above.

Service Area Improvements Study; 50-Year Population and Water Use Study; Capital Efficiency Plan™, SCCRWA

South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA)

NewHavenCT_town_common_aerialWe have provided engineering services and completed numerous studies for the South Central Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA) headquartered in New Haven, Connecticut, serving 17 Cities and Towns and serving a population of over 400,000 people.  Phase 1 of the New Haven Service Area Improvements Study was completed in 2009.  The purpose of the study was to determine the lowest cost set of recommended capital and operational improvements to incorporate additional service areas into the New Haven Service Area.  Our services included evaluating potential improvements to the distribution system to meet SCCRWA’s pressure, tank fluctuation, and fire flow criteria, and recommending a conceptual baseline solution, which was optimized during Phase 2 of the study.  Phase 3, which completed the study, included a Preliminary Design Report with our final recommendations.

We completed a 50-Year Population and Water Use Study for SCCRWA in 2009.  The study examined trends in water use and population growth in each of the towns and service areas served by SCCRWA and projected future water use for average day, maximum day, and maximum month demand throughout the distribution system.  The projections were completed in accordance with guidelines from the Connecticut Department of Public Health and were involved in SCCRWA’s 2009 water supply plan.

In 2008, SCCRWA purchased a water distribution system with approximately 125 miles of water mains and customers located in Ansonia, Derby and Seymour, Connecticut.  Tata & Howard was contracted to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan™ of the new system.  Our services included updating and verifying the existing hydraulic model, evaluating the condition of the existing distribution system infrastructure to determine the adequacy of meeting present and future demands, calculating needed storage requirements, assess and prioritizing system improvements, reviewing and evaluating typical fire flows throughout the system, creating a pipe asset management rating system, and recommending improvements to the distribution system.  Following the success of this effort, Tata & Howard completed Capital Efficiency Plans for the
remainer of the distribution system in 2011 and 2012.

Water Audit, SCCRWA

South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA)

Water_meterA water audit was conducted according to the guidelines outlined by the American Water Works Association (AWWA) in Water Audits and Loss Control Programs, Manual of Water Supply Practices – M36, Third Edition. The data reviewed and analyzed included the volume pumped for each source, source meter errors/calibration, the volume of water imported/exported, billed and unbilled consumption, recorded leakage, main breaks, and unauthorized consumption. Key performance indicators, including Infrastructure Leakage Index (ILI) and non-revenue water, were evaluated to track management of the water utility.  Based on the results of the audit, recommendations were made to improve system operation and reduce non-revenue water.  Although the RWA’s non-revenue water water rate was around 15%, the audit confirmed that the RWA’s Infrastructure Leakage Index or ILI was at industry best practice levels, confirming that apparent losses made up the majority of RWA’s water loss.

The recommendations in the audit report included verification of flows at ten production meters, where serious over-reporting of flow was identified.  As a result of this work, two of the production meters were replaced in 2013, including a 54-inch diameter venturi tube at the RWA’s main source.  The audit report also confirmed statistical analysis of customer meter testing that led to a decision to focus meter replacement work on piston-type meters while leaving older but more statistically accurate nutating disc-type meters in service for longer periods.