KKWWD, ME Organizational Review and Succession Planning BPE

KKWWD-waterTata & Howard conducted a Business Practice Evaluation (BPE) for the Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, and Wells Water District (KKWWD), Maine that included the following:

Task 1: Project Management and Communications

Project kickoff meeting with management staff included discussion of project approach and schedule, level of District involvement, and project deliverables.

Task 2: Organizational Assessment

Reviewed documents, facilitated individual interviews, and conducted on-site workshops to evaluate the current organization against desired business goals and industry best practices.

Task 3: Developed Draft Succession Plan for business continuity of Water District

Developed a Succession Plan based on current personnel and organizational structure. The plan shows a path forward for staff to ascend in the organization through natural progression.

Task 4: Draft and Final Organizational Review and Succession Plan

Prepared Draft and presented results of the Organizational Review and Succession Plan to KKW.  After comments were received on the draft, Tata & Howard provided the final document.

Water Treatment Facility, Water Mains, and River Crossing Horizontal Directional Drilling

directional-drillingTata & Howard provided design and construction services for the construction of a 1.44 mgd water treatment facility.  The water treatment facility consists of a concrete block masonry building housing filtration equipment, a laboratory and office space, and associated piping, instrumentation and controls. Building components including HVAC, plumbing, and electrical services were incorporated in the facility. Other work included, but is not necessarily limited to, site work, exterior piping systems, and electrical work at an existing well pump station.

rock-drill-rigTata & Howard also provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 5,000 linear feet of new 12-inch high-density polyethylene (HDPE) water main (two parallel pipes at 2,500 linear feet, each) via directional drilling beneath the Pemigewasset River, connecting the City’s Franklin Falls Well Site and the City’s Acme Well Site.

Tata & Howard provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 2,655 linear feet of 12-inch diameter Class 52 ductile iron water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Hill Road (New Hampshire Route 3A) and a service road connecting Hill Road to the City’s Acme Well site; approximately 4,000 linear feet of 12-inch water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street; approximately 3,200 linear feet along Lawndale Avenue; 1,200 linear feet along Webster Lake Road; and 600 linear feet along Kimball Street.  The work also included pavement restoration on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street.

The project was funded by NHDES and the USDA Rural Development office.

Dam Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) in Connecticut

dam-eaps
Quillinan Reservoir Dam

Tata & Howard has prepared numerous dam emergency action plans (EAPs) for Connecticut dams in accordance with CT DEEP regulations. Between 2015 and 2017, we have completed 52 EAPs for significant and high hazard dams throughout Connecticut. Our clients have included municipalities, private dam owners, and the CT DEEP. The EAPs include the following:

  • Preparation of an inundation map and flood inundation summary table for the EAP based on the dam failure analysis. The inundation maps include the limits of potential flooding (LoPF), selected cross sections, estimated time to peak stage, and the water depth at selected locations within the LoPF. For dams with no dam failure analysis, Tata & Howard prepared inundation maps for a hypothetical dam failure using hydrologic routing techniques.
  • Preparation of a list of roads and addresses at risk and subject to flooding based on the inundation map.
  • Preparation of dam monitoring procedures including identifying the persons responsible as well as procedures for monitoring the dam during periods of heavy rain and runoff, or when conditions develop that warrant closer monitoring, such as increased or new seepage, cracking, settlement or sabotage. The EAP provides dam specific information to assist the dam owner or operator in determining the appropriate emergency level for the event.
  • dam-inspections
    Papermill Pond Dam

    Preparation of a formal warning notification procedure to alert the local authority responsible for acting on a warning or determining whether to evacuate residents and businesses within the inundation area after an unusual or emergency event is detected or reported at the dam.

  • Preparation of notification flow charts with emergency contact information of federal, state, and local agencies that are responsible for providing emergency services. The flow charts depict the order and circumstance under which the contacts should be notified. The EAPs also include a list of other emergency services contacts, such as the National Weather Service and local media, as well as the addresses of the local emergency operations center (LEOC) and shelters available to residents during an emergency per CT DEEP requirements.
  • Black Pond Dam in Meriden, CT

    Preparation of a termination procedure for ending monitoring and response activities once the emergency is over.

  • Preparation of criteria to review and update the EAP at least once every two years, or more frequently as necessary to reflect significant changes to the dam structure or downstream area, including verification of contacts in the emergency notification charts. The criteria also include guidance for the dam owner to conduct an exercise or test of the EAP concurrent with the review.
  • Preparation of aerial, location, and watershed maps for the dam.

Bliss Street Water Main, Northampton, MA

Bliss Street in Northampton, MA had experienced several water main breaks. Therefore, the City wanted the main to be replaced over the winter rather than waiting until spring. The project included design, bidding, and construction administration services for the water main replacement on Bliss Street from Scanlon Avenue to Willow Street.  The design included new 8-inch diameter ductile iron water main, services, and appurtenances, as well as preparation of base plans from available City records, City GIS mapping data, and field measurements.

Construction occurred during the winter to meet the client’s schedule.  Two change orders were issued to address hydrant extensions and sewer component repairs. The bid opening was the day before Thanksgiving. Construction started in December and was substantially completed by spring.

 

Odor Control at Wastewater Treatment Plant, Lyndon, VT

The wastewater treatment plant in Lyndon, Vermont was experiencing excessive odor issues. The existing odor control system relied primarily on chemical treatment, which was difficult for the operators to manage. Tata & Howard’s project design consisted of a bio-filter with root mulch to remove the odors, which are primarily ammonia, that are generated from the Auto Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion (ATAD) sludge treatment vessels. The ATAD system is a system that results in class A sludge that can be spread anywhere as a fertilizer, and it reduced the annual volume of sludge produced at this facility by 65%. The new system includes fans that pull the air off the top of the ATAD unit vessels through a cool down water wash tank, which knocks down the ammonia, and then pushes the air through PVC piping up through the root bio-filter shown in the picture. The total cost was under $300,000, for which Tata & Howard procured the Town a 100% grant.

The second part of the design project included a nitrogen reduction system for the secondary aeration process that may be necessary in the near future.  The design includes a recirculation pump system from the Anoxic zone back to the Oxic zone. The Contractor was T. Buck Construction of Maine.

lyndonvt_odorcontrol_wwtf_interior

Regional Intermunicipal Interconnection Evaluation, MA

Northampton interconnection mapThrough a grant from the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, Tata & Howard was retained by the City of Northampton Department of Public Works (Northampton) and the City of Easthampton Water Works (Easthampton) to complete a Regional Intermunicipal Interconnection Evaluation for the Easthampton, Hatfield, Northampton, Southampton, and Williamsburg water systems.  The purpose of the study is to evaluate potential water distribution system intermunicipal connections and emergency water supply.  A combined water distribution system regional hydraulic model was developed and used to evaluate the hydraulic feasibility and impacts of the proposed interconnections.  The study evaluated the needed infrastructure improvements, system available supply and demands, and available supply through the potential interconnections.

Potential interconnection locations between Northampton and Easthampton were considered at four locations, between Northampton and Hatfield, between Northampton and Williamsburg, and between Easthampton and Southampton.  Infrastructure recommendations at the locations include construction of new water mains, meter pits, flow meters, pressure reducing valves (PRV) and portable pumping systems. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) Water Management Act (WMA) permitted and registered pumping volumes for each system’s sources was evaluated for potential supply to other communities.  Northampton and Easthampton have surplus supply, while Hatfield, Williamsburg, and Southampton are approaching their WMA permit or registration allowable withdrawal volumes.

The study determined the following:

  • Three of the four potential interconnection locations between Northampton and Easthampton could be utilized in an emergency by isolating portions of Northampton’s system. An interconnection that could serve all of Northampton would require a pumping system.
  • A pressure reducing valve would be required to supply Hatfield from Northampton and a pumping system would be required to supply Northampton from Hatfield.
  • Due to the location of the Williamsburg interconnection along Northampton’s transmission main route, and the limited amount of water available from Williamsburg, an interconnection from Williamsburg to Northampton is not feasible.

There is an existing hydrant to hydrant interconnection between Easthampton and Southampton that has been utilized to supply water to Southampton during periods of high summer demands. To supply the entire Southampton system, a pumping system would be required, and a PRV would be required to maintain adequate pressures if Southampton were to supply Easthampton.

Interceptor Sewer, Danbury, CT

interceptor_sewer
Jacking a 48-inch steel casing under I-84 in Danbury, CT

The Oakland Avenue sanitary sewer project consists of jacking a 48-inch steel casing pipe through the Interstate-84 embankment in Danbury, CT and installing a new 24-inch sanitary sewer to replace the existing 16-inch sewer that is undersized. The project will alleviate the restriction that is causing sewer overflows. Services included surveys and mapping, review of easements, review and updating of original design, preparation of plans and specifications, bidding, construction administration, and resident observation. Construction is currently underway and the project is expected to be completed by the end of this October. The new sewer line installation will complete an interceptor project that was constructed in 1994.

Water Distribution System Evaluation and Tank Design, Paxton, MA

Town of Paxton, MA

The new tank was completed in 2015
The new tank was completed in 2015

Tata & Howard provided engineering services for a comprehensive water distribution system evaluation and study. The work included development of a hydraulic model using WaterCad software. The plan included fire flow tests, review of the water supply agreement with the City of Worcester, preparation of projected water demands based on historical use and population trends, and evaluation of storage. The plan also included an evaluation of potential water supply sources within Town boundaries.

This project included an evaluation of the system prior to design of the tank to determine the best solution.  Work included calibrating the model under extended period simulation (EPS).  The hydraulic model was used to determine the best hydraulic gradeline elevation of the system to reduce the storage surplus.  Additionally, the model was used to track the chlorine residual from the Worcester Pump Station to the extremities.  Jar testing was completed to determine the chlorine demand in the water supply while water quality testing results assisted with determining the chlorine demand in the piping system.  The model was used to simulate the chlorine degradation.  Improvements were input into the hydraulic model and the effects on the chlorine residual in the extremities reported.  Improvements such as an elevated tank at Maple Street with a total usable volume, reduction in hydraulic gradeline elevation, and cleaning and lining water mains were evaluated.  The analysis determined that a new tank at Maple Street is necessary based on water quality and cost.

Tata & Howard provided assistance with the preparation and submittal of a Project Evaluation Form to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for the construction of a new elevated tank with a capacity of 0.2 million gallons. The new tank reduced the water age in the system by replacing the deteriorating ground level tank. Tata & Howard provided construction administration and resident observation services for the new tank, which was completed in 2015.

Stormwater Management: Rooftop Runoff, Whitinsville, MA

Stormwater Engineering: Whitin Wellfield Water Treatment Facility, Whitinsville, MA

stormwater rooftop runoffThe Whitin Wellfield Water Treatment Facility design consisted of a pressure filtration vessel housed within a new pre-fabricated metal building, and upgrades to the chemical feed system housed within an existing building on site. The project also included associated electrical and instrumentation, as well as site stormwater management. The design called for replacement of the existing paved driveway, but since no new impervious pavement was added, the only stormwater runoff that required treatment was the rooftop runoff from the new building. MassDEP guidelines require treatment of runoff from metal roofed buildings within the Zone II radius of a wellfield. The necessary treatment was achieved by discharging the roof runoff into a grass-lined channel. The grass-lined channel provided pre-treatment for a bioretention area, which consisted of a shallow excavation in which specially selected metal-resistant grasses and shrubs were planted within a specific soil to provide treatment. This treatment train provided the necessary total suspended solids removal but did not receive credit for infiltration, which was required by MassDEP. The biofiltration area was designed to collect, store, and infiltrate a 100-year storm event, so although the BMP train did not receive credit by MassDEP standards, the local Conservation Commission agreed that runoff would be infiltrated and therefore approved the design.

Water System Upgrades including Manganese Removal, Montgomery, VT

Montgomery Water System, Montgomery, VT

Tata & Howard designed and constructed the improvements to eliminate low and inadequate system pressures, construct a new source, pilot test filtration for manganese removal, design and construct required distribution system piping to connect the plant and storage tank with the system, design a new concrete storage tank, booster pump stations, and the filtration facility for manganese removal.  The  project was very successful and remains in great condition today.