Capital Efficiency Plan™ and Water Supply Study in Rowley, MA

A Capital Efficiency Plan was completed for the Town of Rowley in May 2017.  The study evaluated the 45 miles of the Town’s water distribution system using the Three Circles Approach, which consists of a system hydraulic evaluation, criticality component assessment, and asset management considerations.  From each set of criteria, system deficiencies were identified and a 20-year recommended improvements plan was provided.  Recommended improvements consisted of water main replacement projects, a pumping capacity evaluation and well redevelopment study, an interconnection analysis, and a distribution static pressure evaluation.

 

Capital Efficiency Plan™ for Norwalk, CT First Taxing District

Tata & Howard, Inc. was retained by the First District Water Department (FDWD) to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan for the First District water system in the City of Norwalk, CT.  Areas of the water distribution system in need of rehabilitation, repair, or replacement, were identified and improvements were prioritized to make the most efficient use of the FDWD’s capital budget. The study evaluated the existing water infrastructure including water transmission and distribution piping and appurtenances.  In addition, water storage needs were evaluated and prioritized.

Tata & Howard evaluated the water distribution system using the Three Circle Approach, which consists of evaluation criteria including a system hydraulic evaluation, a critical component assessment, and asset management considerations.

Hydraulic improvements included recommendations that would strengthen the transmission capabilities of the system or provide an ISO recommended fire flow to a certain area.  Priority 2 recommendations were identified as part of a system-wide evaluation to improve estimated needed fire flows and system looping.

A critical component assessment was performed for the water distribution system to evaluate the impact of potential water main failures on the system.  The critical component assessment includes identification of critical areas served, critical water mains, and the need for redundant mains.  Critical areas served were identified by the FDWD and include water department facilities, medical facilities, schools, and business districts.  Critical water mains include primary transmission lines as well as water mains that cross over major highways, rivers, and railroad tracks. Factors that affected the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main include break history, material, age, diameter, soil conditions, water quality, and pressure.

An asset management assessment was completed for the system.  A number of factors are considered in the ratings including break history, material, age, diameter, soil conditions, water quality, and pressure, and these factors affect the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main.

Utilizing the Three Circle Approach, improvements were recommended and prioritized based on the aforementioned criteria.  Phase I improvements include any recommended improvements that fall into all three circles and are therefore hydraulically deficient, critical, and have a high asset management score.  There are approximately 16,300 linear feet of new main in the Phase I recommended improvements.  Phase II improvements include any recommended improvements that fall into two of the circles.  There are approximately 81,400 linear feet of new main in the Phase IIa and Phase IIb recommended improvements. Phase III recommendations include any recommended improvements that are needed hydraulically or that have a high asset management score indicating poor condition.  The Phase IIIa and Phase IIIb include approximately 157,000 linear feet of new main.  In addition, recommendations included soil testing for corrosivity prior to ductile water main installation, implementation of a unidirectional flushing program, and annual updating of the hydraulic model.

Capital Efficiency Plan™ and Water System Master Plan, Attleboro, MA

Tata & Howard, Inc. was retained by the City of Attleboro to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan and Water System Master Plan for the Attleboro water system.  The purpose of the Capital Efficiency Plan portion of the project was to identify areas of the water distribution system in need of rehabilitation, repair, or replacement, and to prioritize improvements to make the most efficient use of the City’s capital budget.  The Water System Master Plan portion of the project created an inventory of the existing above ground water infrastructure assets including wells, pumping and treatment facilities, and water storage tanks.  The inventory can be used to track maintenance, repair, and replacement work.  Basin safe yields were reviewed and compared to projected demands to evaluate the adequacy of sources of supply. In addition, the project included creation of an extended period simulation (EPS) hydraulic model which can be used to analyze the system and account for changes over time.

An asset management assessment was completed for the system.  Several factors are considered in the assessment including age, material, diameter, break history, soil conditions, water quality, pressure, and whether the main was installed poorly.  These factors affect the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main.  Using our asset management rating approach, each water main in the system was assigned a rating based on these factors. Utilizing the Three Circles Approach, improvements were recommended and prioritized based on the aforementioned criteria. Recommended improvements include the following:

  • Three phases of water main replacement projects;
  • A Water Quality and System Optimization Study to evaluate ways the City can lower the water age in the storage tank;
  • A study to evaluate improvements to maximize available yield;
  • Collection and maintenance of data on water main failures as well as pipe crushing results from water mains that have failed;
  • Testing of soil for corrosivity prior to installation of new ductile iron water mains;
  • Implementation of a Unidirectional Flushing Program; and
  • Minor repairs and security improvements to address deficiencies in the City’s above ground assets.

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Pilot Testing for Iron and Manganese Removal in Barnstable, MA

Pilot testing includes carbon, Greensand, and LayneOx filters

Due to elevated levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), 1,4 Dioxane, and iron and manganese in the three drinking water production wells at the Maher Water Treatment Facility, the Town of Barnstable is proceeding with design and construction of upgrades at the facility to treat for these constituents.   The Town of Barnstable is currently conducting pilot testing at the site to determine the required design parameters, treatment process effectiveness, and best technology to achieve the desired treated water.  Treatment processes associated with pilot testing include GreensandPlus and LayneOx for removal of iron and manganese, advanced oxidation (ultraviolet light with hydrogen peroxide) for removal of 1,4-dioxane, and granular activated carbon (GAC) for removal of PFOS and PFOA.  Treatment for 1,4 Dioxane is the primary goal of the pilot test in order to meet the requirements of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) New Technology Approval process.  The MassDEP has confirmed that pilot testing of GAC filtration at the Maher facility is not a statutory requirement due to the current use of this water treatment technology at the Town’s Mary Dunn Wells and the availability of current water quality data for treatment of PFOS/PFOA within the same water system.  However, the Town has decided to include GAC filtration with pilot testing of advanced oxidation and iron and manganese removal to evaluate the performance of all proposed treatment processes operating together.

UV reactor for pilot test

Pilot testing is being conducted by Blueleaf, Inc. as a sub-consultant to Tata & Howard, Inc.  Pilot testing is scheduled for completion in September 2017.

 

Water Main in Palmer, MA, funded by a CDBG

Tata & Howard provided design of 1,400 linear feet of 12-inch diameter water main on Griffin Street, High Street, and Stewart Street. Work included the preparation of design plans and specifications, hydraulic modeling to determine main size, and letter and cost estimate to the Palmer Community Development Department. Tata & Howard also provided construction administration and resident observation services. The project was funded by a USDA Rural Development Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).

Funding Assistance for WWTF Upgrade in Lyndon, VT

Upgrade for a 750,000 gallon per day extended aeration wastewater treatment facility to an A/O biological facility.  Assistance included acquiring State CWSRF planning grants and USDA Rural Development grant for extensive improvements including separation of combined sewer/stormwater collection systems (CSO), advanced Class A sludge treatment, and reconstruction of original 1970’s treatment facility to new Anoxic/Oxic Treatment System.  Total grant funds were $7,275,000.

UST Removal in Melrose, MA

UST-removalTata & Howard assisted the City of Melrose, MA with the removal of two underground storage tanks (USTs). Tata & Howard engaged the services of a qualified environmental contractor to excavate, remove, and dispose of an out-of-use UST on City property. During the excavation, a team member from our environmental services group observed a second fill pipe indicating the potential presence of a second UST. Upon further investigation, a second undocumented UST was found and the decision to remove both at the same time was made. Tata & Howard team members observed the UST removal activities, submitted confirmatory soil samples for laboratory analyses, prepared the MassDEP UST removal forms and submitted the forms to MassDEP and the Melrose Fire Department within 30 days of the UST removals. Tata & Howard also prepared a summary letter report for the site, which includes a summary of activities performed and conclusions and recommendations with regard to Massachusetts General Law c. 21E and the Massachusetts Contingency Plan.

 

 

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Lead-Contaminated Soil Remediation in Falmouth, MA

The Town of Falmouth retained Tata & Howard to remediate lead-contaminated soil associated with historical firing range activities at a former gravel pit owned by the Town.  Due to the gravel pit’s location within a current drinking water source area, the objective of the remediation was to restore the release to background and remove the potential threat to the underlying groundwater quality.  In addition, the presence of estimated habitats of rare wildlife and priority habitats of rare species at the gravel pit required the filing of a Notice of Intent (NOI) with the Conservation Commission and implementing measures to protect the rare wildlife and species.  Tata & Howard prepared a site-specific scope of work for bidding purposes and managed all the field activities.  Part of the remedial action plan was to screen the soil in an effort to remove the lead bullets and facilitate disposal of the contaminated soil at a Massachusetts lined landfill.  Analytical testing of the soil revealed that some areas contained leachable lead, which required stabilization with Portland cement prior to being transported to the landfill.  During the excavation activities, Tata & Howard utilized a field portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to obtain real-time concentrations of lead in soil.  Use of the XRF minimized contractor down time because decisions relative to the extent of excavation required could be made in the field.  Confirmatory laboratory analytical results correlated well with the XRF data.  Tata & Howard prepared a Permanent Solution with No Conditions Statement, which documents that a condition of No Significant Risk has been achieved at the Site and that the release conditions have been restored to background.

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Waterbury, CT Great Brook Stormwater Culvert

waterbury-ct-great-brook-culvert-groupedTata & Howard provided engineering services for design, preparation of a hydrologic and hydraulic report, two easement maps, design submittals for DOT review, construction administration, and resident observation for the rehabilitation of the Great Brook Stormwater Stormwater Culvert under Cherry Street in Waterbury, CT. The project provided for the replacement of about 65 linear feet of the existing structurally deficient top to the Great Brook Stormwater Culvert under Cherry Street and adjacent private properties.  The existing steel beams, corrugated metal arches, and bituminous concrete or concrete slabs forming the top of the culvert were removed and precast concrete beams were placed on elastomeric bearing pads to form the replacement culvert top. Additionally, about 50 linear feet of the existing eroded cobblestone bottom were removed to a minimum depth of 12 inches and replaced with reinforced cast in place concrete.  Further, approximately 32 linear feet of undermined walls (16 linear feet on the west side and 16 linear feet on the east side) were excavated, with cast in place concrete placed below the existing culvert masonry walls.  The interior culvert masonry walls within the project limits were also repointed. The work required the reconstruction of 30 feet of Cherry Street, the adjacent sidewalks, and approximately 750 square feet of a private gravel parking lot property. During construction, a water control system capable of conveying normal flow capacity of the Great Brook Stormwater Culvert at Cherry Street was maintained.

Trinity Ave. Chemical Feed Pump Station, Grafton, MA

Tata & Howard provided engineering services for permitting, design, and bidding of the 1.3 mgd chemical injection Trinity Avenue Pump Station at the Trinity Avenue Wellfield.  The project included an evaluation of alternatives for the access road including installation of a bridge or an open bottomed culvert; assistance with the preparation of permanent easements for the installation of utilities and roadway to the well site; preparation and submittal of an NOI to the Grafton Conservation Commission.  The design included an access road, bailey bridge with abutments, double wythe block building, interior concrete painted block with wood truss roof and asphaltic shingles, installation of three (3) submersible pumps and pitless adaptors, approximately 1,800 linear feet of 6-inch and 12-inch water main, emergency liquid propane tanks and generator, instrumentation and controls, a SCADA system for the pump station and wells, and a 24-inch transmission main for 4-log removal. Security included chain link fence, gates, locks, intrusion alarms, and lighting.  Tata & Howard also assisted Owner with the coordination of the installation of three phase power to site.  Chemical feed at the station includes KOH for pH adjustment and chlorine gas for disinfection.  Standby power was included in an outdoor enclosure. The project is currently under construction and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.