Water Main in Palmer, MA, funded by a CDBG

Tata & Howard provided design of 1,400 linear feet of 12-inch diameter water main on Griffin Street, High Street, and Stewart Street. Work included the preparation of design plans and specifications, hydraulic modeling to determine main size, and letter and cost estimate to the Palmer Community Development Department. Tata & Howard also provided construction administration and resident observation services. The project was funded by a USDA Rural Development Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).

Funding Assistance for WWTF Upgrade in Lyndon, VT

Upgrade for a 750,000 gallon per day extended aeration wastewater treatment facility to an A/O biological facility.  Assistance included acquiring State CWSRF planning grants and USDA Rural Development grant for extensive improvements including separation of combined sewer/stormwater collection systems (CSO), advanced Class A sludge treatment, and reconstruction of original 1970’s treatment facility to new Anoxic/Oxic Treatment System.  Total grant funds were $7,275,000.

UST Removal in Melrose, MA

UST-removalTata & Howard assisted the City of Melrose, MA with the removal of two underground storage tanks (USTs). Tata & Howard engaged the services of a qualified environmental contractor to excavate, remove, and dispose of an out-of-use UST on City property. During the excavation, a team member from our environmental services group observed a second fill pipe indicating the potential presence of a second UST. Upon further investigation, a second undocumented UST was found and the decision to remove both at the same time was made. Tata & Howard team members observed the UST removal activities, submitted confirmatory soil samples for laboratory analyses, prepared the MassDEP UST removal forms and submitted the forms to MassDEP and the Melrose Fire Department within 30 days of the UST removals. Tata & Howard also prepared a summary letter report for the site, which includes a summary of activities performed and conclusions and recommendations with regard to Massachusetts General Law c. 21E and the Massachusetts Contingency Plan.

 

 

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Lead-Contaminated Soil Remediation in Falmouth, MA

The Town of Falmouth retained Tata & Howard to remediate lead-contaminated soil associated with historical firing range activities at a former gravel pit owned by the Town.  Due to the gravel pit’s location within a current drinking water source area, the objective of the remediation was to restore the release to background and remove the potential threat to the underlying groundwater quality.  In addition, the presence of estimated habitats of rare wildlife and priority habitats of rare species at the gravel pit required the filing of a Notice of Intent (NOI) with the Conservation Commission and implementing measures to protect the rare wildlife and species.  Tata & Howard prepared a site-specific scope of work for bidding purposes and managed all the field activities.  Part of the remedial action plan was to screen the soil in an effort to remove the lead bullets and facilitate disposal of the contaminated soil at a Massachusetts lined landfill.  Analytical testing of the soil revealed that some areas contained leachable lead, which required stabilization with Portland cement prior to being transported to the landfill.  During the excavation activities, Tata & Howard utilized a field portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to obtain real-time concentrations of lead in soil.  Use of the XRF minimized contractor down time because decisions relative to the extent of excavation required could be made in the field.  Confirmatory laboratory analytical results correlated well with the XRF data.  Tata & Howard prepared a Permanent Solution with No Conditions Statement, which documents that a condition of No Significant Risk has been achieved at the Site and that the release conditions have been restored to background.

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Waterbury, CT Great Brook Stormwater Culvert

waterbury-ct-great-brook-culvert-groupedTata & Howard provided engineering services for design, preparation of a hydrologic and hydraulic report, two easement maps, design submittals for DOT review, construction administration, and resident observation for the rehabilitation of the Great Brook Stormwater Stormwater Culvert under Cherry Street in Waterbury, CT. The project provided for the replacement of about 65 linear feet of the existing structurally deficient top to the Great Brook Stormwater Culvert under Cherry Street and adjacent private properties.  The existing steel beams, corrugated metal arches, and bituminous concrete or concrete slabs forming the top of the culvert were removed and precast concrete beams were placed on elastomeric bearing pads to form the replacement culvert top. Additionally, about 50 linear feet of the existing eroded cobblestone bottom were removed to a minimum depth of 12 inches and replaced with reinforced cast in place concrete.  Further, approximately 32 linear feet of undermined walls (16 linear feet on the west side and 16 linear feet on the east side) were excavated, with cast in place concrete placed below the existing culvert masonry walls.  The interior culvert masonry walls within the project limits were also repointed. The work required the reconstruction of 30 feet of Cherry Street, the adjacent sidewalks, and approximately 750 square feet of a private gravel parking lot property. During construction, a water control system capable of conveying normal flow capacity of the Great Brook Stormwater Culvert at Cherry Street was maintained.

Trinity Ave. Chemical Feed Pump Station, Grafton, MA

Tata & Howard provided engineering services for permitting, design, and bidding of the 1.3 mgd chemical injection Trinity Avenue Pump Station at the Trinity Avenue Wellfield.  The project included an evaluation of alternatives for the access road including installation of a bridge or an open bottomed culvert; assistance with the preparation of permanent easements for the installation of utilities and roadway to the well site; preparation and submittal of an NOI to the Grafton Conservation Commission.  The design included an access road, bailey bridge with abutments, double wythe block building, interior concrete painted block with wood truss roof and asphaltic shingles, installation of three (3) submersible pumps and pitless adaptors, approximately 1,800 linear feet of 6-inch and 12-inch water main, emergency liquid propane tanks and generator, instrumentation and controls, a SCADA system for the pump station and wells, and a 24-inch transmission main for 4-log removal. Security included chain link fence, gates, locks, intrusion alarms, and lighting.  Tata & Howard also assisted Owner with the coordination of the installation of three phase power to site.  Chemical feed at the station includes KOH for pH adjustment and chlorine gas for disinfection.  Standby power was included in an outdoor enclosure. The project is currently under construction and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

Manganese Filtration Using Biological Pressure Filtration

The Home Farm Water Treatment Plant (WTP) in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts was originally constructed in 1989. Although the WTP is still fully functional, its treatment capabilities are limited to chemical addition and air strippers for VOC removal, and the plant is capable of treating 6.0 million gallons per day (mgd). Manganese is present at all Home Farm wells, with widely varying levels from a low 0.03 parts per million (ppm) to a high 0.7 ppm. The existing treatment plant sequesters manganese, but does not have the ability to remove it from finished water.

Three treatment methodologies were piloted. The first two were greensand and pyrolucite, both commonly implemented catalytic media options for removing manganese and iron. The third was Mangazur®, a new technology. Mangazur® filter media contains the microscopic organism leptothrix ochracea, which consumes manganese and is naturally occurring in groundwater. Through consumption, the microbes oxidize the manganese to a state where it can precipitate onto the media. Unlike other media, Mangazur® does not require regeneration due to the continuous growth of microbes within the filter. Mangazur® technology also does not require chemical addition for pre-oxidation, minimizing the amount of chemical required for the plant.

Pilot testing for the biological treatment was performed over five one-week trials. Test parameters included a long shut-down on the filters, adding pre-oxidant, and adjusting pH or dissolved oxygen. The results of the testing indicated that although the Mangazur® does require a correct dissolved oxygen level and pH, it does not require a pre-oxidant, making the only chemical addition necessary for pretreatment potassium hydroxide for pH adjustment. Filter backwash efficiency is also a major benefit of the Mangazur® technology for the Home Farm application. With loading rates twice that of traditional catalytic media and filter runs exceeding 96 hours; the Town would only need to backwash the four filters once every four days rather than eight filters every day, saving a significant amount of water. The backwash flow rate and duration are also significantly lower for Mangazur® filters than for other traditional filter options. The results of the pilot tests indicated that all technologies were viable options to reduce manganese levels below 0.05 ppm; however, the biological treatment was the most efficient and attractive option.

Initially, the Town was only considering constructing filters along with the required backwash holding tanks in a new building and utilizing the chemical feed systems in the existing treatment facility. However, as the project progressed it was determined that it would be more cost effective to replace the existing aging air strippers rather than to continue to rehabilitate them, and eliminate the need to re-pipe the flow since the existing strippers added too much dissolved oxygen prior to the biological units. Since the existing chemical feed equipment in the plant is aging and the existing building itself was also in need of rehabilitation, the decision was made to construct an entirely new standalone 7.0 mgd facility. The new facility also contains three deep bubble aerators for VOC removal.

While Mangazur® technology has been approved in one other municipality in Massachusetts, there are few treatment plants in the northeast using this technology, and of those treatment plants, none have a design capacity above 5.0 mgd.  Home Farm has a much higher design capacity and will be the largest Mangazur® water treatment plant in the northeast once completed.  The Mangazur® filters at Home Farm will have the second highest design capacity in the country, after a 26.0 mgd treatment plant in Lake Havasu City, Arizona.


 

 

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KKWWD, ME Organizational Review and Succession Planning BPE

KKWWD-waterTata & Howard conducted a Business Practice Evaluation (BPE) for the Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, and Wells Water District (KKWWD), Maine that included the following:

Task 1: Project Management and Communications

Project kickoff meeting with management staff included discussion of project approach and schedule, level of District involvement, and project deliverables.

Task 2: Organizational Assessment

Reviewed documents, facilitated individual interviews, and conducted on-site workshops to evaluate the current organization against desired business goals and industry best practices.

Task 3: Developed Draft Succession Plan for business continuity of Water District

Developed a Succession Plan based on current personnel and organizational structure. The plan shows a path forward for staff to ascend in the organization through natural progression.

Task 4: Draft and Final Organizational Review and Succession Plan

Prepared Draft and presented results of the Organizational Review and Succession Plan to KKW.  After comments were received on the draft, Tata & Howard provided the final document.

Water Treatment Facility, Water Mains, and River Crossing Horizontal Directional Drilling

directional-drillingTata & Howard provided design and construction services for the construction of a 1.44 mgd water treatment facility.  The water treatment facility consists of a concrete block masonry building housing filtration equipment, a laboratory and office space, and associated piping, instrumentation and controls. Building components including HVAC, plumbing, and electrical services were incorporated in the facility. Other work included, but is not necessarily limited to, site work, exterior piping systems, and electrical work at an existing well pump station.

rock-drill-rigTata & Howard also provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 5,000 linear feet of new 12-inch high-density polyethylene (HDPE) water main (two parallel pipes at 2,500 linear feet, each) via directional drilling beneath the Pemigewasset River, connecting the City’s Franklin Falls Well Site and the City’s Acme Well Site.

Tata & Howard provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 2,655 linear feet of 12-inch diameter Class 52 ductile iron water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Hill Road (New Hampshire Route 3A) and a service road connecting Hill Road to the City’s Acme Well site; approximately 4,000 linear feet of 12-inch water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street; approximately 3,200 linear feet along Lawndale Avenue; 1,200 linear feet along Webster Lake Road; and 600 linear feet along Kimball Street.  The work also included pavement restoration on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street.

The project was funded by NHDES and the USDA Rural Development office.

Dam Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) in Connecticut

dam-eaps
Quillinan Reservoir Dam

Tata & Howard has prepared numerous dam emergency action plans (EAPs) for Connecticut dams in accordance with CT DEEP regulations. Between 2015 and 2017, we have completed 52 EAPs for significant and high hazard dams throughout Connecticut. Our clients have included municipalities, private dam owners, and the CT DEEP. The EAPs include the following:

  • Preparation of an inundation map and flood inundation summary table for the EAP based on the dam failure analysis. The inundation maps include the limits of potential flooding (LoPF), selected cross sections, estimated time to peak stage, and the water depth at selected locations within the LoPF. For dams with no dam failure analysis, Tata & Howard prepared inundation maps for a hypothetical dam failure using hydrologic routing techniques.
  • Preparation of a list of roads and addresses at risk and subject to flooding based on the inundation map.
  • Preparation of dam monitoring procedures including identifying the persons responsible as well as procedures for monitoring the dam during periods of heavy rain and runoff, or when conditions develop that warrant closer monitoring, such as increased or new seepage, cracking, settlement or sabotage. The EAP provides dam specific information to assist the dam owner or operator in determining the appropriate emergency level for the event.
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    Papermill Pond Dam

    Preparation of a formal warning notification procedure to alert the local authority responsible for acting on a warning or determining whether to evacuate residents and businesses within the inundation area after an unusual or emergency event is detected or reported at the dam.

  • Preparation of notification flow charts with emergency contact information of federal, state, and local agencies that are responsible for providing emergency services. The flow charts depict the order and circumstance under which the contacts should be notified. The EAPs also include a list of other emergency services contacts, such as the National Weather Service and local media, as well as the addresses of the local emergency operations center (LEOC) and shelters available to residents during an emergency per CT DEEP requirements.
  • Black Pond Dam in Meriden, CT

    Preparation of a termination procedure for ending monitoring and response activities once the emergency is over.

  • Preparation of criteria to review and update the EAP at least once every two years, or more frequently as necessary to reflect significant changes to the dam structure or downstream area, including verification of contacts in the emergency notification charts. The criteria also include guidance for the dam owner to conduct an exercise or test of the EAP concurrent with the review.
  • Preparation of aerial, location, and watershed maps for the dam.