Licensed Site Professional (LSP) Services in Melrose, MA

In November 2015, during the replacement of the water main along Tremont Street, an odor was noted emanating from the trench excavated to install a temporary water supply to the City of Melrose Department of Public Works (DPW) building.  A reportable release condition was subsequently found at the property and a former gasoline pump dispenser is the suspected source of the release.

Tata & Howard provided Licensed Site Professional (LSP) services for the project that included the observation of a test pit, drilling soil borings, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, soil sampling, and groundwater sampling.  The initial soil sampling results indicate the presence of residual gasoline contaminants at concentrations exceeding the applicable Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) Reportable Concentrations.  Therefore, Tata & Howard assisted the City with notifying MassDEP of the release.

Soil borings were drilled and soil samples were collected to delineate the extent of the release and to assess the source of the release, which is suspected to be a former gasoline dispenser that was removed in 1999.  Tata & Howard conducted a Method 1 Risk Characterization to evaluate the risk of harm to health, safety, public welfare, and the environment posed by the presence of residual gasoline contaminants in soil.  The results of the Method 1 Risk Characterization indicate that a condition of No Significant Risk exists for current and future foreseeable activities at the Site and an Activity and Use Limitation is not necessary to maintain a level of No Significant Risk.  Tata & Howard prepared a Permanent Solution with No Conditions Statement to document these findings and submitted the report to MassDEP.

Environmental Services, Wilmington, MA

environmental-servicesBy utilizing a 2014 revision to the regulations, Tata & Howard achieved permanent closure for a commercial developer on a Site in Wilmington, Massachusetts. The contaminants of concern at the Site are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). The CVOCs were detected in June 1994 as part of a due diligence assessment for bank financing, and the sources of the CVOCs are from prior operations at the Site that utilized chlorinated solvents to clean electronic parts. These compounds were released to the environment through improper disposal and leakage from the equipment that was used onsite.

Remedial activities were performed at the Site to reduce the concentrations of CVOCs in soil and groundwater, and in August 2000, a Class C Response Action Outcome (RAO) was filed with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) as a Temporary Solution. The Class C RAO concludes that there was “No Substantial Hazard” to human health, safety, public welfare, or the environment caused by the contamination at the premises. However, the ultimate goal was to achieve a condition of “No Significant Risk” and file a Permanent Solution. Because this was just a Temporary Solution, groundwater monitoring of selected wells continued through 2015 to demonstrate that conditions at the Site continued to support the No Substantial Hazard conclusion.

The hurdle to achieving No Significant Risk was overcome in 2014 when MassDEP revised the regulations to allow the use of active vapor intrusion mitigation systems to achieve a Permanent Solution. In May 2015, T&H filed a Release Abatement Measure (RAM) Plan for the installation of a sub-slab depressurization system (SSDS) at the Site. Based on more recent data, six points and radon type fans were installed to develop a negative pressure field beneath the western portion of the building that would mitigate the intrusion of CVOC vapors into the building. T&H also installed a remote telemetry system equipped with an alarm that will notify MassDEP and the owner of the building if the SSDS fails due to loss of power, mechanical issues, or other disruption of the system.

The building is primarily comprised of office and commercial warehouse space, and an Activity and Use Limitation was implemented as part of the Permanent Solution to prohibit more sensitive uses in the future, such as daycare or residential.

 

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Environmental Remediation, Quincy, MA

WORK Inc., Environmental Remediation Services, Quincy, MA

WORKInc_demo_beforeWORK Inc. provides onsite training and employment for disabled individuals, most of whom have significant developmental or cognitive disabilities.  WORK Inc. is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities with its highest rating, and licensed by the MA Department of Developmental Services.  As a human services agency, WORK Inc. places a high premium on human health and safety.  It has a health and safety committee, with external members including an insurance risk manager, to ensure that the agency is engaging in safe practices with minimal, if any, risks to human health and the environment.

In 2008, WORK Inc. decided to relocate from 3 Arlington Street in Quincy, Massachusetts to Dorchester, Massachusetts because the buildings at the Quincy site were in extremely poor condition.  When a due diligence assessment was performed at the Quincy site, several contaminants, including chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), arsenic, cadmium, lead, and nickel were detected in soil and groundwater.  The sources of these compounds were found to be a former foundry, machine shop, and plating facility that were located at the site well before WORK Inc. took ownership.  Because they did not cause the contamination, WORK Inc. was eligible for a Brownfields Grant from the USEPA to pay for the cleanup.  T&H assisted with the preparation of the grant application and a remedial grant of $200,000 was received by WORK Inc. – the first eligible party in the entire City of Quincy to receive such funds.

In November 2009, WORK Inc. moved to the Dorchester facility and the Quincy facility was razed in spring 2011 to allow for redevelopment and to give better access to the contaminated soil and groundwater.  The demolition project was coordinated by T&H, who provided field observation and coordination services.

Approximately 800 cubic yards of metals contaminated soil were excavated and disposed offsite.  During the excavation, T&H collected soil samples from the sidewalls and bottoms of the excavations for screening with a portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer.  Soil samples from the periphery of the excavation were then sent for confirmatory analyses at a laboratory to verify that significant concentrations of metals do not remain in soil at the site.

To address the CVOCs, T&H coordinated the drilling of four membrane interface probes (MIPs) to gather continuous CVOC data that were used to further define the vertical and horizontal extent of contamination and soil stratification.  These data indicate that the highest response to CVOCs was an approximate ten foot zone of soil located just above the bedrock.  Based on the MIPs data, T&H observed the installation of deep groundwater monitoring wells that were constructed with short screen sections set on top of the bedrock.  T&H is currently implementing a pilot test to evaluate the effectiveness of enhanced bioremediation for the remediation of the CVOCs in groundwater.