Chamberlain Highway Receives New Water Main Connections

The Chamberlain Highway in Meridan, Connecticut has 536 linear feet of new 16-inch ductile iron main and two new fire hydrants. After Tata & Howard completed several test pits to verify connection locations at each end of the new main, construction work started on May 3, 2018 with the installation of a 16” x 16” tapping sleeve and valve at the north end of the project. This existing water main at the north end connection was originally installed in 1894.

Chamberlain West MainWork progressed south until the new main was approximately 50 feet away from the other connection point in West Main Street. Connections to the existing main in West Main Street was performed over a 36-hour period due to the complexity and amount of utilities around the service connection, including a live 24-inch water main five feet away and multiple telephone conduits located 6 inches above the replaced main. Tata & Howard personnel on site at all times to observe that work was in performed in accordance to the plans and specifications.

Following the completion of the Chamberlain Highway water infrastructure improvement project, work to replace two water mains on the state-owned bridge crossing Sodom Brook in Meridan will begin.

UMASS Amherst Hydraulic Modeling

Tata & Howard developed an extensive hydraulic model of the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst campus. The model was verified under steady state and an extended period simulation (EPS) was completed.  Tata & Howard conducted a hydraulic review and criticality assessment and used the results to make improvement recommendations.  Tata & Howard also identified water distribution system sustainability projects for the irrigation, cooling tower makeup, and toilet flushing water.

This project included a supplemental water supply system analysis.  Potential ground and surface water sources on campus, including existing and potentially new stormwater retention ponds, were evaluated for process and irrigation water.  In addition, Tata & Howard created a hydraulic model of the UMass reclaimed water system.

The study also examined the effects that the proposed system improvements and interconnections would have on water quality.

A Decade of Infrastructure Improvements

Wiscasset Completes Capital Efficiency Plan™ Infrastructure Improvements

The Wiscasset Water District (WWD) completed its final phase of water main replacements for the Town of Wiscasset, ME. In 2007, Wiscasset, a rural coastal town in Maine, embarked on a long-awaited infrastructure improvement program to replace the Town’s century-old waterlines. The Wiscasset Water District, engaged Tata & Howard’s services in 2010, to prepare a Capital Efficiency Plan™ (CEP), to identify areas to the Town’s water distribution system needing rehabilitation, repair, and/or replacement.

CEP reportThe Capital Efficiency Plan™ report which included hydraulic modeling, system criticality, and an asset management plan, provided the Utility with a database and Geographic Information System (GIS) representation for each pipe segment within their underground piping system. The CEP report also prioritized the water distribution system piping improvements and provided estimated costs to replace or rehabilitate the water mains.

Wiscasset Main StreetIn response to the CEP™ findings, the Wiscasset Water District retained the services of Tata & Howard, to perform design, bidding, construction administration, and resident project representation services for a series of water main projects.

Phased over 10 years, the plan included replacing 33,150 feet of 12-inch and 8-inch piping, installation of a water storage tank mixer, SCADA upgrades, and office landscaping improvements.

The final phase of water main replacements is scheduled to be completed during the summer of 2018 and will fulfill all the Priority I water main improvements identified in the 2010 CEP™ report. The projects were funded in part by a combination of USDA Rural Development grants (6 total) and loans (7 total), as well as coordination with the Maine Department of Transportation and Rural Development.

With the water main improvements nearing completion, the Wiscasset Water District has retained Tata & Howard to reevaluate its 2010 Capital Efficiency Plan™. The revised plan will update the water main inventory database and review additional recommended water distribution improvements.

Extended Period Simulation and Hydraulic Study for Town of Avon, MA Water Division

Tata & Howard completed an Extended Period Simulation (EPS) hydraulic model of the water distribution system for the Town of Avon, Massachusetts. An EPS model was created to account for changes in the water distribution system over an extended period to include peak and minimum demands during both the summer and winter months. These changes included tank levels, pump controls, value operation, and demand variations.

The EPS model was used to estimate the water age in the water distribution system under winter and summer demand conditions. Water age is the time water takes to travel from a water supply source to a point within the distribution system.  It is used as an indicator of water quality based on the assumption that the older the water is, the greater the likelihood that water quality has deteriorated.  According to MassDEP Finished Water Storage Guidelines, a three to five-day complete water turnover is recommended in water storage tanks.

The EPS model was also utilized to evaluate the Town’s existing system operations. The model was used to determine the optimal tank operating range and the impact of the run times on the well pumps. Simulations were performed on both the Center Street and Page Street Tanks to evaluate operations under existing and projected average day demand (ADD), maximum day demand (MDD), and peak hour demands with a minimum pressure of 35 psi maintained throughout the distribution system.

In addition to analyzing the tank optimal operating levels, changes to the existing pump operations and the effect on tank levels and water age were evaluated. Two modified pump operations scenarios were evaluated. Both scenarios were run with the existing tank water level controls and allowing the Page Street Tank to drop four feet.  A second modified pump operation scenario evaluated the Town’s lead/lag system. Results for the pump and tank level operations under these simulations were recorded for both summer and winter operations.

Based on the results from each operational modification, Tata & Howard made several recommendations for improvement to the water distribution system. These included allowing the water level in the Page Street and Central Street tanks to drop an additional six feet to improve water age during both the summer and winter demands.

In addition, to help improve the water age in the tanks to an optimal three to five-day complete water turnover as recommended by MassDEP Finished Water Storage Guidelines, Tata & Howard suggested installing mixing systems in each tank.

Capital Efficiency Plan™ for Manchester-By-The-Sea, MA

Tata & Howard, Inc. was recently retained by the Town of Manchester-by-the-Sea to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan for the Town’s water system.  The system was evaluated to identify areas of the water distribution system in need of rehabilitation, repair, or replacement, and to prioritize improvements to make the most efficient use of the Town’s capital budget.  The study evaluates the existing water infrastructure including water transmission and distribution piping and appurtenances.  In addition, water storage and supply needs were evaluated and prioritized. The analysis and improvements in this report are based on the Three Circles Approach for optimum capital efficiency, which combines hydraulic and critical component considerations with an asset management rating system to evaluate the condition of the water mains in the distribution system.  Each circle represents a unique set of evaluation criteria for each water main segment.  From each set of criteria, system deficiencies are identified.  System deficiencies from each circle are then compared.  Any deficiency that falls into more than one circle is given higher priority than one that does not.  Using the Three Circle Approach, recommended improvements will result in the most benefit to the system.  In addition, the Three Circle Approach allows us to identify any situations that mitigate a deficiency in one circle and eliminate a deficiency in another circle.  By integrating all three sets of criteria, the infrastructure improvement decision making process and overall capital efficiency are optimized.

Recommendations included a siting study for a second storage tank, Phase I-III distribution system improvements, and the continuance of scheduled maintenance programs such as hydrant flushing, leak detection, and meter testing. The Town’s pavement management plan was also taken into consideration to best prioritize and coordinate utility work with roadway reconstruction.

 

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Capital Efficiency Plan™ and Water Supply Study in Rowley, MA

A Capital Efficiency Plan was completed for the Town of Rowley in May 2017.  The study evaluated the 45 miles of the Town’s water distribution system using the Three Circles Approach, which consists of a system hydraulic evaluation, criticality component assessment, and asset management considerations.  From each set of criteria, system deficiencies were identified and a 20-year recommended improvements plan was provided.  Recommended improvements consisted of water main replacement projects, a pumping capacity evaluation and well redevelopment study, an interconnection analysis, and a distribution static pressure evaluation.

 

Capital Efficiency Plan™ for Avon, MA

Page Street Tank

Tata & Howard recently completed a Capital Efficiency Plan™ for the Town of Avon, MA.  As part of the project, Tata & Howard updated and verified the Town’s existing hydraulic model.  The work included the completion of fire flow tests throughout the Town and allocation of demands using up-to-date billing and parcel data.  The Capital Efficiency Plan™ identified and prioritized areas for improvement within the distribution system.  Our services included evaluating the condition of the existing distribution system infrastructure to determine the adequacy of meeting present and future demands, assessing and prioritizing system improvements, reviewing and evaluating typical fire flows throughout the system, creating a pipe asset management rating system, and recommending improvements to the distribution system. Recommendations included installation of two replacement wells, conducting an interconnection study, rehabilitation of the Page Street Tank, and phased distribution system improvements.

The hydraulic model was also verified under an Extended Period Simulation (EPS), which considers changes in the distribution system over time.  The EPS will be used to evaluate tank operating ranges and modifications to the well operating conditions.

 

Capital Efficiency Plan™ for Norwalk, CT First Taxing District

Tata & Howard, Inc. was retained by the First District Water Department (FDWD) to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan for the First District water system in the City of Norwalk, CT.  Areas of the water distribution system in need of rehabilitation, repair, or replacement, were identified and improvements were prioritized to make the most efficient use of the FDWD’s capital budget. The study evaluated the existing water infrastructure including water transmission and distribution piping and appurtenances.  In addition, water storage needs were evaluated and prioritized.

Tata & Howard evaluated the water distribution system using the Three Circle Approach, which consists of evaluation criteria including a system hydraulic evaluation, a critical component assessment, and asset management considerations.

Hydraulic improvements included recommendations that would strengthen the transmission capabilities of the system or provide an ISO recommended fire flow to a certain area.  Priority 2 recommendations were identified as part of a system-wide evaluation to improve estimated needed fire flows and system looping.

A critical component assessment was performed for the water distribution system to evaluate the impact of potential water main failures on the system.  The critical component assessment includes identification of critical areas served, critical water mains, and the need for redundant mains.  Critical areas served were identified by the FDWD and include water department facilities, medical facilities, schools, and business districts.  Critical water mains include primary transmission lines as well as water mains that cross over major highways, rivers, and railroad tracks. Factors that affected the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main include break history, material, age, diameter, soil conditions, water quality, and pressure.

An asset management assessment was completed for the system.  A number of factors are considered in the ratings including break history, material, age, diameter, soil conditions, water quality, and pressure, and these factors affect the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main.

Utilizing the Three Circle Approach, improvements were recommended and prioritized based on the aforementioned criteria.  Phase I improvements include any recommended improvements that fall into all three circles and are therefore hydraulically deficient, critical, and have a high asset management score.  There are approximately 16,300 linear feet of new main in the Phase I recommended improvements.  Phase II improvements include any recommended improvements that fall into two of the circles.  There are approximately 81,400 linear feet of new main in the Phase IIa and Phase IIb recommended improvements. Phase III recommendations include any recommended improvements that are needed hydraulically or that have a high asset management score indicating poor condition.  The Phase IIIa and Phase IIIb include approximately 157,000 linear feet of new main.  In addition, recommendations included soil testing for corrosivity prior to ductile water main installation, implementation of a unidirectional flushing program, and annual updating of the hydraulic model.

Capital Efficiency Plan™ and Water System Master Plan, Attleboro, MA

Tata & Howard, Inc. was retained by the City of Attleboro to complete a Capital Efficiency Plan and Water System Master Plan for the Attleboro water system.  The purpose of the Capital Efficiency Plan portion of the project was to identify areas of the water distribution system in need of rehabilitation, repair, or replacement, and to prioritize improvements to make the most efficient use of the City’s capital budget.  The Water System Master Plan portion of the project created an inventory of the existing above ground water infrastructure assets including wells, pumping and treatment facilities, and water storage tanks.  The inventory can be used to track maintenance, repair, and replacement work.  Basin safe yields were reviewed and compared to projected demands to evaluate the adequacy of sources of supply. In addition, the project included creation of an extended period simulation (EPS) hydraulic model which can be used to analyze the system and account for changes over time.

An asset management assessment was completed for the system.  Several factors are considered in the assessment including age, material, diameter, break history, soil conditions, water quality, pressure, and whether the main was installed poorly.  These factors affect the decision to replace or rehabilitate a water main.  Using our asset management rating approach, each water main in the system was assigned a rating based on these factors. Utilizing the Three Circles Approach, improvements were recommended and prioritized based on the aforementioned criteria. Recommended improvements include the following:

  • Three phases of water main replacement projects;
  • A Water Quality and System Optimization Study to evaluate ways the City can lower the water age in the storage tank;
  • A study to evaluate improvements to maximize available yield;
  • Collection and maintenance of data on water main failures as well as pipe crushing results from water mains that have failed;
  • Testing of soil for corrosivity prior to installation of new ductile iron water mains;
  • Implementation of a Unidirectional Flushing Program; and
  • Minor repairs and security improvements to address deficiencies in the City’s above ground assets.

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UST Removal in Melrose, MA

UST-removalTata & Howard assisted the City of Melrose, MA with the removal of two underground storage tanks (USTs). Tata & Howard engaged the services of a qualified environmental contractor to excavate, remove, and dispose of an out-of-use UST on City property. During the excavation, a team member from our environmental services group observed a second fill pipe indicating the potential presence of a second UST. Upon further investigation, a second undocumented UST was found and the decision to remove both at the same time was made. Tata & Howard team members observed the UST removal activities, submitted confirmatory soil samples for laboratory analyses, prepared the MassDEP UST removal forms and submitted the forms to MassDEP and the Melrose Fire Department within 30 days of the UST removals. Tata & Howard also prepared a summary letter report for the site, which includes a summary of activities performed and conclusions and recommendations with regard to Massachusetts General Law c. 21E and the Massachusetts Contingency Plan.

 

 

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