Patrick S. O’Neale, P.E. named President of Massachusetts Water Works Association

Patrick S. O’Neale, P.E. named President of Massachusetts Water Works Association

MARLBOROUGH, MASS. (PRWEB) NOVEMBER 06, 2019

The Massachusetts Water Works Association (MWWA) announced that Patrick S. O’Neale, P.E. has been appointed as President of the Association, effective November 1, 2019. Patrick is a Senior Vice President at Tata & Howard, Inc., a Northeast leader in water engineering and consulting.

O’Neale is a seasoned engineer with more than 38 years of consulting experience with specialized expertise in water treatment, water distribution system analysis, design, and construction. Patrick has served on the MWWA Board of Directors since 2015 and has been a member of the Program Committee since 2010 where he most recently served as co-chair. He is looking forward to serving as President and assisting in MWWA’s commitment to the drinking water profession. Patrick’s Presidency will promote the new MWWA Vision Statement of professionalism, stewardship, and confidence in every drop.

“Tata & Howard has a longstanding relationship with the MWWA, and we are pleased to see Patrick take on this exciting new role with the organization,” says Paul Howard, Co-Founder and Senior Vice President of Tata & Howard. “Patrick’s passion and unwavering commitment to promoting clean and safe drinking water to the Massachusetts community will be a true asset as he assumes this position.”

The Massachusetts Water Works Association, Inc. is a membership organization dedicated to the advancement of the drinking water profession. Through education and advocacy, MWWA is committed to public health by promoting a safe and sufficient supply of drinking water to Massachusetts consumers.

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Founded in 1992, Tata & Howard, Inc. is a 100% employee-owned water, wastewater, and stormwater consulting engineering firm dedicated to consistently delivering innovative, cost-effective solutions in the water environment. Tata & Howard has gained a solid reputation as an industry leader in the Northeast by bringing knowledge, integrity, and dedicated service to all-sized markets, both public and private. The firm has offices in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.tataandhoward.com.

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Peter Goodwin joins Tata & Howard as new Office Manager in Salem, NH

Peter Goodwin joins Tata & Howard as new Office Manager in Salem, NH

SALEM, N.H. (PRWEB) OCTOBER 22, 2019

Tata & Howard, Inc., a Northeast leader in water engineering consulting, is pleased to welcome Peter Goodwin to the firm. Peter joins us as the new Office/Project Manager in the Salem, New Hampshire office. In this role, Goodwin will manage the Salem office while working directly with clients and a team of design engineers in a variety of civil engineering projects including pipelines, pump stations, and water/wastewater treatment facilities.

He has 35 years of municipal engineering consulting experience and is known in the industry for his strong business development experience with demonstrated success in company growth and expansion. His professional experience includes a wide range of water, wastewater, stormwater, and environmental engineering projects, including planning, design, permitting, construction administration, operations, and funding assistance. Goodwin’s most recent experience has been associated with cutting edge technologies in asset management and trenchless rehabilitation/replacement of aging infrastructure.

“Peter’s extensive experience in project management and client services will be instrumental in the continued growth of our firm,” said Paul B. Howard, P.E., Senior Vice President and Co-Founder. “We are looking forward to his contributions and are excited to welcome him to the team.”

A graduate of Northeastern University, Goodwin holds a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and has been active in several state and regional professional associations. He is a current Board Member for the New Hampshire Public Works Association (NHPWA) as well as the Committee Chair for the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA)-Veterans Workforce Development Committee. He is also a Past-President (2015) of the New Hampshire Water Pollution Control Association (NHWPCA) and former State Director for the Maine Water Environment Association (MEWEA).

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Founded in 1992, Tata & Howard, Inc. is a 100% employee-owned water, wastewater, stormwater, and environmental services consulting engineering firm dedicated to consistently delivering innovative, cost-effective solutions in the water environment. Tata & Howard has gained a solid reputation as an industry leader in the Northeast by bringing knowledge, integrity, and dedicated service to all-sized markets, both public and private. The firm has offices in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.tataandhoward.com.

Click here to view full press release.

Clean Water Inspired by the Form of a Flower

Clean Water Inspired by the Form of a Flower

When thinking of flowers, it’s hard not to appreciate the water that is necessary for them to grow. But have you ever thought about the significance of a flower when it comes to clean water?

A team in the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin has developed a new device for collecting and purifying water. Inspired by the structure of a rose, the flower-like device costs less than two cents to make and can supply more than a half-gallon of water per square meter.

water filtration and production device that resembles the inner workers of a rose.
Photo: UTexas.edu

Inspiration

The team of Ph.D. candidates led by Professor Donglei Fan were fueled by the creation of a new approach for solar steaming – a technique that uses energy from the sun to separate salt and other impurities from water through evaporation. Their origami rose inspired system could be a new paradigm for water production and treatment for both individuals and homes.

Existing solar-steaming technologies are typically bulky, expensive, and produce limited results. The UT team aimed to create a solution using portable, lightweight and inexpensive materials. The result – a product that looks like a black-petaled rose in a glass jar. While portable and low-pressure controlled solar-steaming systems known as ‘unisystems’ do exist, the flower structure portion of the design is new.

Inner-workings

The system is made from layered, black paper sheets that are shaped into petals. The 3D rose shape, attached to a stem-like tube that collects untreated water from any water source, makes it easier for the structure to collect and retain more liquid. The black paper is filtered and coated with a polymer known as polypyrrole. Polypyrrole is a material known for its photothermal properties – meaning that it coverts solar light into thermal heat.

Water Collection

There are two ways in which the device collects water. The first is through the stem-like tube that feeds water to the flower-inspired structure on top. The second way is through collecting water from above – occurring in instances such as rainfall. In either case, water finds its way to the petals where the polypyrrole coating turns the water into steam. The impurities are naturally separated from water when condensed in this way. By the end of the purification process, the device can remove contamination from heavy metals and bacteria, as well as salt from seawater. The result is clean water that meets drinking standard requirements set by the World Health Organization.

In addition to the new, flower-like structure, the system was also designed to include a connection point for a low-pressure pump. This pump will help condense water more effectively. Once condensed, water will fall into a compact, sturdy and secure glass jar. Weigu Li, a Ph.D. candidate in Fan’s lab said that their “rational design and low-cost fabrication of 3D origami photothermal materials represents a first-of-its-kind portable low-pressure solar-steaming-collection system” could inspire a new wave of clean water production technologies.

International Women’s Day 2019

International Women’s Day 2019

International Women’s Day 2019 | Women in Engineering


For the last 108 years, International Women’s Day (IWD) has taken place on March 8 all around the world. IWD is a global day of recognition celebrating the social, political, economic, and cultural achievements of women.
While the personal meaning of this day may vary, the global theme of equality and celebration resonates with a powerful force. From big cities and sprawling country sides, to tiny villages and corporate organizations, women and men alike are showing their support for all the women who make a difference each and every day.

The Women of Tata & Howard

At Tata & Howard, we feel particularly lucky to work alongside such talented and fantastic women. Of the 60 individuals who make up our firm across seven locations, 22 (or 37 percent) are women. On top of that, our two co-presidents are also women. Karen L. Gracey and Jenna W. Rzaza have more than 43 years in combined engineering experience, and go above and beyond to lead our team to its fullest potential. In an industry that has been predominantly dominated by men for the last several centuries, it prides us to see the strides and achievements being made within our company and others like us around the world.

Some of the Tata & Howard women in the Marlborough, MA office.

On International Women’s Day, and every day, we are thankful for the women who make up our team.
Christine Beliveau – Marketing Coordinator
Katie Carreira – Assistant Project Engineer
Justine Carroll, P.E. – Associate
Molly Coughlin – Assistant Project Engineer
Natalia Close – Engineer
Meghan Davis – Project Engineer
Karen Gracey, P.E. – Co-President
Chelsea Henderson – Engineer
Meagan Heslin, P.E. – Project Engineer
Eyleen Izaguirre – Engineer
Patricia Kelliher – Project Engineer
Jessica Kemp – Marketing Communications Manager
Kasey Kenyon – Engineer
Melissa Leach, P.E. – Senior Project Engineer
Maria Maynard – Manager of Human Resources
Jenna O’Connell – Engineer
Carmen Perkins – Staff Accountant
Jenna Rzasa, P.E, – Co-President
Allison Shivers, P.E.  – Project Engineer
Jan Stone – Administrative Assistant
Kaitlin Tallman – Engineer
Mary Vermes – Staff Accountant

A few of the Tata & Howard men showing their support for their colleagues on International Women’s Day in the Marlborough, MA office.

Today we celebrated with our usual ‘Friday treats’ and acknowledged all of the great work our female engineers and staff members do throughout the year.





Introduce a Girl to Engineering

Introduce a Girl to Engineering

Inspiring Young Women

On April 23, 2018, Tata & Howard hosted an Introduce a Girl to Engineering event. Thirty-four junior girl scouts (from grades 4-5) from five local troops attended our interactive and informative overview of environmental engineering.

Women engineers from the company were eager to welcome the scouts. They know from experience how important it is to inspire young girls and get them excited about a successful career in engineering. They also know the challenges women often face in the field of engineering long known to be male-dominated.

Slowly, however, this trend is beginning to change, as more young women are earning engineering degrees.

Girls scouts groupTwenty-five years ago, when Tata & Howard was a newly established company, graduating classes from engineering schools may have been 1-2 percent women. As recently as 2016, about 20 percent of graduating engineers were female, and today, Tata & Howard stands out in the Water and Wastewater industry out as a 100% employee-owned company, led by two women co-president engineers, and 38 percent of its workforce being female engineers.

These women engineers are the future role models and inspiration for young girls. On this night, they were excited to share their experiences with the girl scouts and tell them what it is like to be an environmental engineer in the water and wastewater industry.

Their excitement was unmistakable.

We presented a colorful slideshow illustrating how clean water is delivered to our homes—starting from groundwater or surface water sources and pumped through pipes to a water treatment facility. The water treatment process was shown with a simple water filtration demonstration, screening dirty water with both coarse rocks and a coffee filter.  After going through a treatment process, it was explained that clean water is then stored in tanks and eventually ends up in the pipes that lead to our homes—and any place where we can turn on the tap and drink water.

The presentation was followed by questions, answers, and everyone’s favorite…pizza. The girls were then divided into seven teams and instructed to build a freestanding water tank using only a handful of ordinary items, such as a plastic cup (the tank), drinking straws, bubble gum, band aids, string, thumbtacks, string, paper clips, and toothpicks.  The challenge lasted 30 minutes, after which, 8 ounces of water was poured into the water tank creations to test for structural integrity and left to stand for 30 seconds without spilling any liquid.

Girl Day Water Tank Instructions

Lots of excitement and fun ensued as the water towers wobbled, leaked and finally toppled into a watery mess! Not all the tanks collapsed however. A few withstood the water test challenge and a winning team emerged—the Llamacorns—who built a tower standing tall at 11 ¼”. The Greatest Kitty Cookie team came in a close second with a 9 ½” tall structure.

Before leaving for the evening, each scout was presented with a certificate and a merit badge. Many thanks to all the Tata & Howard women volunteers who helped make Introduce a Girl to Engineering a memorable and enjoyable event for these young girls.

And hopefully…the girls also left with a greater appreciation and enthusiasm about pursuing a career in engineering.

Team Results:

Double Bubble – 8 ¼” Collapsed
The River & the Sky – 16 ½” Collapsed
Beautifully Disgusting – 6 ½” Leaked
Llamacorns – 11 ¼” Winning team!
The Greatest Kitty Challenge – 9 ½” – Second Place
Royalty – 11 ½” Collapsed
Water Dogs – 4 ¾” Leaked

T&H Celebrates the Holidays!

holiday-2016-all-employees

T&H’s annual holiday celebration was held on Tuesday, December 20, and it was a big success with food, gifts, and some fun competition. We were excited to have several fellow employee-owners from our satellite offices join us for the holiday fun.

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T&H employee-owners enjoying a catered Italian luncheon as they celebrate the holidays

 

Drawing numbers out of a hat, employee-owners crossed their fingers for our gift giveaway. There were several awesome gifts ranging from gift cards to Bose speakers. Congratulations to our grand prize winner, T&H Project Environmental Scientist James DeAngelis who won an Apple watch!

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T&H Project Environmental Scientist James DeAngelis showing off his new Apple watch.

Employee-owners also participated in a friendly dessert competition. Project Manager Amanda Cavaliere won best homemade dessert with for her amazing custard trifle. For best store bought dessert category, IT Manager James Field stole the show with a delicious tiramisu. The best presentation category went to Engineer Keighty Tallman, who impressed everyone with her creative gingerbread teddy bears.

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Like every year, this year’s holiday celebration was a great time with a lot of laughs. From our family to yours, Happy Holidays!

T&H Celebrates the Holidays!

holiday-2016-all-employees
T&H’s annual holiday celebration was held on Tuesday, December 20, and it was a big success with food, gifts, and some fun competition. We were excited to have several fellow employee-owners from our satellite offices join us for the holiday fun.

img_1014
T&H employee-owners enjoying a catered Italian luncheon as they celebrate the holidays

 
Drawing numbers out of a hat, employee-owners crossed their fingers for our gift giveaway. There were several awesome gifts ranging from gift cards to Bose speakers. Congratulations to our grand prize winner, T&H Project Environmental Scientist James DeAngelis who won an Apple watch!
img_1037
 
img_1067
T&H Project Environmental Scientist James DeAngelis showing off his new Apple watch.

Employee-owners also participated in a friendly dessert competition. Project Manager Amanda Cavaliere won best homemade dessert with for her amazing custard trifle. For best store bought dessert category, IT Manager James Field stole the show with a delicious tiramisu. The best presentation category went to Engineer Keighty Tallman, who impressed everyone with her creative gingerbread teddy bears.
img_1025
Like every year, this year’s holiday celebration was a great time with a lot of laughs. From our family to yours, Happy Holidays!

Tata & Howard announces corporate office expansion

Tata & Howard announces corporate office expansion

MARLBOROUGH, MA, July 28, 2015Tata & Howard, Inc. is pleased to announce the 4,645 square foot expansion of its corporate headquarters in Marlborough, MA. The expansion provides an additional 17 workspaces, six offices, a spacious modeling room, a dedicated printing and copying center, and a new conference room.

Tata & Howard’s 4,645 square foot corporate office expansion includes a new modeling room
Tata & Howard’s 4,645 square foot corporate office expansion includes a new modeling room

“We are very excited to announce the expansion of our corporate office, as it is a reflection of the continued growth and success our company has experienced since its inception,” said Jack O’Connell, P.E., LEED, Senior Vice President of Tata & Howard, Inc. Mr. O’Connell oversaw design and construction of the new space. “Using input from our employee-owners, our priorities for the new space included creative and collaborative workspaces, comfortable meeting and production areas, and work-life amenities such as adjustable standing desks, plentiful windows, and inviting colors.”

“Due to the extraordinary increase in our client base over the past two years, our number of employee-owners has grown by nearly 50%, and our geographic reach has extended to the national level,” added Karen Gracey, P.E., Vice President. “With the expansion of our corporate office, we are well equipped to accommodate the growth we are currently experiencing, and to provide resources to enhance our already tremendous talent base.”

“Our unprecedented growth is a direct result of exceptional client relationships and our solid reputation in the industry,” added Gracey.

Andrew Cohen from ACTWO in Wayland acted as Architect for the expansion, while Mike Walsh and Mark Pellard from Seaver Construction in Woburn acted as Project Manager and Superintendent, respectively. The expansion, which also included updating the existing 10,000 square foot space, was completed mid-July.

The 7 Most Interesting Dams in the United States

Grand Coulee Dam
Grand Coulee Dam

1. Grand Coulee Dam

The Grand Coulee Dam, a concrete gravity dam, is located on the Columbia River west of Spokane, Washington and is listed by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of the seven civil engineering wonders of the United States. The dam’s reservoir, Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, stretches 150 miles north and almost reaches the Canadian border. The dam was constructed to provide hydroelectric power and irrigation.

Even more enormous than the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Grand Coulee is an absolutely massive structure, and one of the largest ever constructed by mankind. The 550 foot tall dam contains over 12 million cubic yards of concrete, which is enough to build a highway all the way from Miami, Florida to Seattle, Washington, and stretches 5,223 feet — just 57 feet shy of a mile. The construction of the Grand Coulee dam took place between 1933 and 1942 and provided jobs to thousands of men during the Great Depression. The Grand Coulee provided the immense electrical power needed to manufacture aluminum for the production of World War II planes and ships, and, continuing in its war-like vein, it also powered the production of plutonium at a secret lab on nearby Hanford Site. Plutonium, of course, turned out to be the key ingredient of the atomic bomb – and the rest is history.

The dam is not without some controversy. 77 men lost their lives during the construction of the dam and its original two powerhouses, and another four perished during the construction of the third power plant constructed between 1967-1975, bringing the final death count to 81. Also, creation of the reservoir partially flooded the ancestral lands of Native Americans and forced the relocation of over 3,000 people, and environmentalists have condemned the dam for blocking the migration of salmon and steelhead to spawn.

Today, the Grand Coulee is used to irrigate about 670,000 acres of farmland used for growing grains, fruits, vegetables, and wine grapes, as well as livestock grazing.

Hoover Dam
Hoover Dam

2. Hoover Dam

The Hoover Dam, located in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River on the border of Arizona and Nevada, is a massive concrete arch-gravity dam whose 600-foot base is as wide as the full length of two football fields. The giant concrete wedge stands 726 feet tall, or the height of a 60-story building, and holds back the immense power of the Colorado River. The Hoover Dam was constructed in order to generate electricity as well as provide irrigation and control flooding, and today generates about four billion kilowatts of electricity per year – enough to provide the power needs for 1.3 million people.

At the time of its construction between 1931 and 1935, the Hoover Dam was the most expensive engineering project in United States history at a cost of $49 million, which, adjusting for inflation, would be $700 million by today’s standards. The Hoover Dam created the enormous reservoir known as Lake Mead, which even today is the largest manmade reservoir in the U.S. at 110 miles long and 560 feet deep. In addition, the Hoover Dam and beautiful Lake Mead have created a bustling tourism community by providing plenty of outdoor recreation including boating, swimming, and fishing. Lake Mead also supplies municipal water for Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Tucson, and provides storage during drought.

Building the Hoover Dam took enormous effort. Construction of the dam utilized 91.8 billion cubic feet of concrete to create a retaining wall that weighs about 6.6 million tons. In fact, the mass of concrete in the Hoover Dam would pave a road from San Francisco to New York City. In addition, the volume of water in Lake Mead, when filled to capacity, is enough to submerge the entire state of Connecticut in ten feet of water. Incredibly enough, although the dam was expected to take five years to construct, it was actually completed ahead of schedule. 96 people died during the construction of the Hoover Dam; however, contrary to the popular urban legend, none of the deceased are encased within the dam’s concrete.

Oroville Dam
Oroville Dam

3. Oroville Dam

Oroville Dam, located about 70 miles north of Sacramento at the three forks of the Feather River, is the tallest dam in the United States, standing over 770 feet tall. The dam is an earthfill dam that holds back Lake Oroville, a manmade reservoir containing 3.5 million acre-feet of water. Oroville Dam stretches three quarters of a mile at its base and almost 7,000 feet across at its top.

The most highly monitored dam in the world during construction, the Oroville Dam was built between 1961 and 1967, and was officially dedicated in 1968. Just seven short years later, in 1975, a significant earthquake struck a few miles southeast of Oroville, and the new dam was put to the test. To the credit of the engineers, the dam oscillated with the earthquake and did not suffer a solitary crack or leak.

The Oroville Dam, along with its reservoir, Lake Oroville, not only provides drinking water, water storage, and hydroelectric power, it also protects downstream residents from the flooding of the Feather River. Providing about 750,000 acre-feet of flood control storage, the Oroville Dam has minimized damage from floods that have occurred in every decade since the dam’s construction. It also provides a beautiful location for a plethora of recreational activities including boating, camping, and fishing.

Tragically, 34 men died during the construction of the Oroville Dam. Just two years after the dam’s completion, President Richard Nixon signed the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) into law, drastically reducing the number of workplace accidents and casualties.

Redridge Steel Dam
Redridge Steel Dam

4. Redridge Steel Dam

Located across the Salmon Trout River in Redridge, Michigan, the Redridge Steel Dam is is a flat slab buttress dam constructed of steel. Steel is rarely used for construction of dams, which are typically earthenworks or masonry, and the Redridge Steel Dam is one of only three steel dams ever constructed in the United States. The other two are the Ashfork-Bainbridge Steel Dam, constructed in Arizona in 1898 to supply water for railway operations and still fully operational, and the Hauser Lake Dam, which was constructed in 1901 in Montana but failed less than a year later.

Timber Crib Dam Falls
Timber Crib Dam Falls

Prior to the construction of the Redridge Steel Dam, the Atlantic Mining Company built a timber crib dam across the Salmon Trout River in order to create a reservoir to supply water for mining operations. The reservoir created by the timber crib dam was insufficient, and so the Redridge Steel Dam was built; however, the original timber crib dam remained submerged in place upstream of the new dam. After operating for several decades, the Redridge Steel Dam fell into disrepair after mining operations ceased, and in 1941, the dam broke and caused a flood. The dam owners opened the spillways and cut holes in the steel dam so that it would no longer retain any water, and in this way the original timber dam was revealed — and along with it, breathtaking waterfalls.

With the threat of being labeled a “significant hazard” dam by the Michigan Department of Environmental looming, the timber dam was lowered 13 feet in 2004 in order to relieve pressure and make it safer. While a more permanent solution is still needed, both dams have been estimated to be safe for the foreseeable future, allowing visitors the ability to appreciate the lovely falls created by the old timber dam.

Roosevelt Dam
Roosevelt Dam

5. Roosevelt Dam

Constructed between the walls of a box canyon near the Salt River and Tonto Creek, the Roosevelt Dam was the first water project built under the 1902 Reclamation Act, and was the largest masonry dam in the world at that time. Italian stonecutters carved the stones used in the construction of the dam from the nearby cliffs, and when completed, the dam stood 280 feet tall and 184 feet wide at its base. The dam supplied water and electricity while also controlling the dangerous floods that had plagued the nearby Phoenix area.

Construction of the dam occurred between 1905 and 1911 while Arizona was still just a territory, and the total cost was $10 million. Supplying electricity to rural households, the Roosevelt Dam was a modern marvel. It would be ten years before the National Rural Electrification Act brought power to the rest of rural America, and so Phoenix quickly became a bright, modern city, and Arizona officially became a state only one year after the dam’s completion. The Roosevelt Dam was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1963 and, to this day, it adorns the state seal of Arizona.

Dworshak Dam
Dworshak Dam

6. Dworshak Dam

Located just outside the city of Orofino, Idaho on the North Fork of the Clearwater River, the Dworshak Dam is the tallest straight axis gravity dam in the Western Hemisphere and the third highest dam in the United States. Constructed between 1966 and 1973, the Dworshak Dam is primarily used for flood control and hydroelectric power. The dam has three power-generating unts and received authorization for three more in 1990; however, the authorizations were revoked amid political controversy and citizen opposition when it was found that a second dam would be needed to handle peak loads.

The reservoir created by the Dworshak Dam holds almost 3.5 million acre-feet of water and is 53 miles long. The dam stands 717 feet tall, generates 380,000 kilowatts of power, and contains more than twice the concrete than does Cheope’s Great Pyramid in El Giza, Egypt.

Perhaps more notable than its significant mass is the controversy that has surrounded the Dworshak Dam since its inception. In his travel guide Idaho for the Curious, Cort Conley writes, “There have always been more politicians than suitable damsites. Building the highest straight axis gravity dam in the Western Hemisphere, on a river with a mean flow of 5,000 cubic feet per second, at a cost of $312 million, in the name of flood-control, is the second-funniest joke in Idaho. The funniest joke is inside the visitor center: a government sign entreats, ‘…help protect this delicate environment for future generations.’ The North Fork of the Clearwater was an exceptional river with a preeminent run of steelhead trout, and the drainage contained thousands of elk and white-tail deer. The Army Corps of Engineers proceeded to destroy the river, habitat, and fish; then acquired 5,000 acres for elk management and spent $21 million to build the largest steelhead hatchery in the world, maintaining at a cost of $1 million dollars a year what nature had provided for nothing.”

New Cornelia Mine Tailings Dam
New Cornelia Mine Tailings Dam

7. New Cornelia Mine Tailings

OK, so the New Cornelia Mine Tailings is not really a dam per se, but it IS often cited as the largest dam structure in the country by its volume of 7.4 billion cubic feet. Located just south of Ajo, Arizona, the New Cornelia Mine was operational from 1912 until 1983, when it closed due to the low price of copper. Mine tailings are waste materials such as bits of rock, dirt, mud, and process effluent from the mining process. While the mine was operational, the tailings were heaped into an enormous pile in order to hold back future tailings, and therefore the tailings pile is actually considered a dam. Today, Phelps Dodge owns the mine. There has also been recent talk of mining the tailings, although nothing has yet been scheduled.

Do you agree with our list of the 7 most interesting dams in the United States or do you know of a dam that should be included? Let us know – we’d love to hear from you!

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