ACEC/MA Announces Tata & Howard, Inc. as a winner of Bronze Engineering Excellence Award for their work on the Home Farm Water Treatment Plant

ACEC/MA Announces Tata & Howard, Inc. as a winner of Bronze Engineering Excellence Award for their work on the Home Farm Water Treatment Plant

MARLBOROUGH AND SHREWSBURY, MA –SEPTEMBER 1, 2020

The American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) has named Tata & Howard, Inc. as a winner of their 2020 Bronze Engineering Excellence Award for their work on the new Home Farm Water Treatment Plant in Shrewsbury, MA.

The 2020 Engineering Excellence Awards were recently announced and will be celebrated at the 2021 ACEC/MA Engineering Excellence and Awards Gala. The awards celebrate innovation, ingenuity, and excellence in engineering achievement.

Tata & Howard, Inc. provided lead engineering services for the design and construction administration of the new 7.0 mgd Home Farm Water Treatment Plant in Shrewsbury, MA. The new plant, which replaced an aging facility built in 1989, provides the Town with the ability to treat more water, remove elevated levels of manganese, and produce stable water quality. The project reached Substantial Completion on schedule and was completed within budget. The plant is the largest biological pressure filtration facility in the northeast United States.

Founded in 1992, Tata & Howard, Inc. is a 100% employee-owned water, wastewater, and stormwater consulting engineering firm dedicated to consistently delivering innovative, cost-effective solutions in the water environment. Tata & Howard has gained a solid reputation as an industry leader in the Northeast by bringing knowledge, integrity, and dedicated service to all-sized markets, both public and private. The firm has offices in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.tataandhoward.com.

“The Engineering Excellence Awards program recognizes engineering firms for projects that demonstrate a high degree of achievement, value and ingenuity,” said Jenn Howe, President of the American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts and Principal and Vice President at SMMA, Symmes Maini & McKee Associates. “Entrants are rated by an independent panel of judges from the architectural community, the construction industry, academia, the media, and the public sector on the basis of uniqueness and originality; future value to the profession and perception by the public; social, economic and sustainable development considerations; complexity; and successful fulfillment of the client/owner’s need, including schedule and budget. We congratulate them and thank them for their contributions to improving the quality of our everyday lives.”

About ACEC/MA
The American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) is the business association of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island engineering industry, representing over 120 independent engineering companies engaged in the development of transportation, environmental, industrial, and other infrastructure. Founded in 1960 and headquartered in Boston, MA, ACEC/MA is a member organization of the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) based in Washington, DC.  ACEC is a national federation of 51 state and regional organizations. For more information on ACEC/MA, visit their website at www.acecma.org. ACEC/MA is undertaking an awareness campaign to educate the public on the many contributions engineers make (or the engineering innovations) in everyday life through their hash tag #EngineeringGoFigure. To Follow us on Twitter:  @ACECMA

 

2020 Engineering Excellence Award

2020 Engineering Excellence Award – Bronze Winner

Tata & Howard, Inc. is pleased announce the Shrewsbury, MA Home Farm Water Treatment Plant as a Bronze winner for the 2020 American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts’ (ACEC/MA) 2020 Engineering Excellence Award.

Tata & Howard evaluated various treatment options for design and construction of a water treatment facility based on loading rates, removal efficiencies, and estimated costs for removal of manganese. Manganese levels of the Home Farm Wells in Shrewsbury, MA had exceeded MassDEP’s Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) of 0.05 mg/L and the Office of Research and Standards Guidelines (ORSG) Lifetime Health Advisory limit of 0.3 mg/l. Based on the result of pilot testing, Tata & Howard, Inc. recommended biological pressure filtration for removal of iron and manganese.

Tata & Howard, Inc. provided lead engineering services for the design, permitting, funding assistance, bidding, award, construction administration, and resident project representation of a new 7.0 million gallons per day (mgd) Home Farm Water Treatment Plant to replace the existing treatment facility, which did not have processes to remove manganese.

The Water Treatment Plant focuses around biological pressure filtration processes for manganese removal using naturally occurring groundwater microorganisms with minimal chemical addition. Biological pressure filtration offers higher loading rates than conventional catalytic media for iron and manganese removal.

The Home Farm Water Treatment Plant is the largest biological pressure filtration facility in the northeast United States. The Home Farm Water Treatment Plant cost $14,900,000 inclusive of engineering and contingencies, of which approximately $1.2 million was for the biological filters.

Winning ACEC Engineering Excellence Award projects exemplify ingenuity and professionalism and represent the breadth of engineering’s contributions to our everyday lives. Projects display outstanding examples of how engineers connect communities, provide safe and reliable water and energy, and make buildings safe and efficient.

Wastewater Rundown: Direct Potable Reuse Vs. Indirect Potable Reuse

Wastewater Rundown: Direct Potable Reuse Vs. Indirect Potable Reuse

Every day we encounter wastewater. We create it through flushing the toilet, washing our hands, taking showers, running the dishwasher, and more. In fact, all water affected by human use is wastewater. Although it’s a constant part of our lives, wastewater is often overlooked. Have you ever thought about what happens to the water we flush away? Where does it go? How does it get treated? Do we use it again? Read on to learn about the ways in which we utilize treated wastewater, particularly through direct potable reuse and indirect potable reuse.

The Quick (and Dirty)

The wastewater treatment process begins the second a drop of water goes down the drain. That water becomes sewage – which is 99 percent dirty water. The other one percent is made up of solids, chemicals, fats, nutrients, and other miscellaneous matter. From here, water travels within the sewage network through pipes, pumps, and plants for treatment. First in this process is the screening of large objects and debris from the water. Next, bacteria, contaminants, organic, and inorganic matter are removed through digestion and aeration processes. Within these phases, nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are reduced to protect the environment and support our communities. When the water is clean, it then goes on to be clarified and disinfected with chlorine or ultraviolet light.

A Bright Idea

For as long as time, humans have relied on the natural water cycle to obtain drinking water. From the days of sifting water from brooks to later advancements including drinking water treatment facilities – the source of our drinking water has always come from surface or groundwater. When water is plentiful, we source it from watersheds and treat it to drinking water standards. But what happens when water supplies run low? When there is less rain and more demand for water? One solution is potable water reuse – the notion of reusing the used water we normally discard for drinking. The two types of potable water reuse are indirect potable reuse and direct potable reuse.

Indirect Potable Reuse

Indirect potable reuse (IPR) is more common and has been successfully used within the United States for the last 50 years. With IPR, water is first treated at a wastewater treatment facility. It is then pumped into a natural basin or reservoir where it is filtered naturally through the ground before being sent back into the water supply. The downside of IPR is that the water gets ‘dirty’ all over again and needs to be treated once more before it is safe to drink.

Direct Potable Reuse

On the contrary, direct portable reuse (DPR) is a fairly new concept and involves the treatment and distribution of water without an environmental buffer. In this process, the very clean water from the advanced water purification plant is put straight back into the water supply. These advanced purification systems are used by utilities around the world and process and test the water supply to ensure standards are met.

T&H designed the Home Farm Water Treatment Plant in Shrewsbury, MA

The first DPR system was implemented about five years ago in Big Spring, TX to face the state’s relentless droughts. The DPR system at the Colorado River Municipal Water District in Big Spring takes treated wastewater, purifies it, and then mixes it with the city’s regular water supply. Eventually, water heads back to consumers’ taps.

Although the DPR process is new in the grand scheme of things, it has proven to be effective. As we face global climate change and recognize drinking water as the valuable resource it is, innovations like DPR are certainly beneficial.

What are your thoughts on DPR?

 

ON-DEMAND WEBINAR: Horizontal Directional Drilling of Raw Water Intakes into Long Pond, Falmouth, MA

ON-DEMAND WEBINAR: Horizontal Directional Drilling of Raw Water Intakes into Long Pond, Falmouth, MA

Ryan Neyland, P.E., Project Manager, presented this webinar on Horizontal Direction Drilling of Raw Water Intakes into Long Pond, Falmouth MA. Regulatory and customer-based drivers led the Falmouth Water Department to construct a new water treatment plant (WTP) at Long Pond.  Due to the location of the new WTP in relation to the existing pump station facility and intake, new intakes and a raw water pump station were needed to pump water from Long Pond to the WTP.  This presentation will discuss pipe and screen installation utilizing horizontal directional drilling methods to minimize any potential impacts to the pond during construction.

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"Groundbreaking" News!

Excavation for the new 7.0 mgd Home Farm Water Treatment Plant began in July 2017

This week, we broke ground on construction of the 7.0 mgd Home Farm Water Treatment Plant in Shrewsbury, MA. The new treatment plant uses Mangazur® biological filter media to treat manganese. While Mangazur® technology has been approved in one other municipality in Massachusetts, there are few treatment plants in the northeast using this technology, and of those treatment plants, none have a design capacity above 5.0 mgd.  Home Farm will be the largest Mangazur® water treatment plant in the northeast once completed, and will have the second highest design capacity in the country, after a 26.0 mgd treatment plant in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. For complete project details, click here.
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“Groundbreaking” News!

Excavation for the new 7.0 mgd Home Farm Water Treatment Plant began in July 2017

This week, we broke ground on construction of the 7.0 mgd Home Farm Water Treatment Plant in Shrewsbury, MA. The new treatment plant uses Mangazur® biological filter media to treat manganese. While Mangazur® technology has been approved in one other municipality in Massachusetts, there are few treatment plants in the northeast using this technology, and of those treatment plants, none have a design capacity above 5.0 mgd.  Home Farm will be the largest Mangazur® water treatment plant in the northeast once completed, and will have the second highest design capacity in the country, after a 26.0 mgd treatment plant in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. For complete project details, click here.

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Dilla Street Water Treatment Plant Open House a Huge Success

Randytour

On October 26, Milford Water Company held an open house for the newly completed Dilla Street Water Treatment Plant. Tata & Howard’s Randy Suozzo, P.E., Project Manager for the project, and Neil Callahan, Project Manager for R.H. White Construction Company during construction, led attendees on the tour and answered questions.

The event, which lasted four hours, was attended by nearly 150 people and garnered excellent reviews. “I found it very interesting and informative. The technology is incredible,” noted attorney Warren Heller. And attendee Bill Sanborn commented, “It’s good to see our dollars at work.”

Unlike its predecessor, which utilized slow sand filters constructed in the early 1900’s, the new plant uses dissolved air flotation (DAF) to filter impurities. The process, though technologically advanced, is simple to understand: particulates and contaminants are floated to the top of a filter tank and removed, and the resulting water is then further filtered through granulated activated carbon (GAC) and chlorine tanks before being disbursed to water mains. In addition, the new treatment facility utilizes far less chlorine than its predecessor. Noted Milford Water Company Manager David Condrey, “We are putting in half what we put in with the old plant.”

The new facility also integrates multiple safety measures. Every step of the filtration process is precisely controlled by a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system, and the plant itself is monitored 24-hours a day. “There are over 300 alarms in the plant. Everything is tracked,” assured Callahan.

Milford water bottlesOpen House attendees were treated to custom bottled water. The bottles bore Milford Water Company labels and the water itself came directly from the treated water at the plant. Condrey said that Milford Water Company intends to continue bottling small batches of water to be donated at local road races and other community events.