Ozone Water Treatment Plant in Franklin, MA

Tata & Howard provided design and construction services for a new water treatment facility that houses a 1.2 mgd ultrafiltration system and completed a pilot test that consisted of an evaluation of two separate ultrafiltration technologies.  Franklin Wells No. 1 and 2, located off Hayward Street in Franklin, Massachusetts were installed in the 1940’s with a combined safe yield of 1.2 million gallons per day. Due to high concentrations of iron and manganese in the groundwater, the wells were only used to meet peak water demands during the summer months. The construction of the water treatment facility recaptures the yield from these two sources.  The water treatment facility consists of a main building which houses static mixers, ozone feed equipment, chemical feed equipment, prefilters, membrane filtration equipment, instrumentation and controls. Treatment consists of ozone oxidation followed by membrane ultrafiltration. The project was funded in part by the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust through a low interest state revolving fund loan.

The overall treatment scheme is as follows: ozone injection, oxidation of iron and manganese in an ozone contact tank, prefiltration, treatment through two ultrafiltration membrane skids, chlorination prior to a clearwell, and fluoride addition prior to discharge into the distribution system. The plant is designed to recycle backwash water and membrane recirculation water to the head of the plant utilizing two decant tanks. Ozone is produced on site utilizing compressed air, while a LOX tank is available to allow for the production of additional ozone if required in the future.

 

Water Main in Palmer, MA, funded by a CDBG

Tata & Howard provided design of 1,400 linear feet of 12-inch diameter water main on Griffin Street, High Street, and Stewart Street. Work included the preparation of design plans and specifications, hydraulic modeling to determine main size, and letter and cost estimate to the Palmer Community Development Department. Tata & Howard also provided construction administration and resident observation services. The project was funded by a USDA Rural Development Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).

Funding Assistance for WWTF Upgrade in Lyndon, VT

Upgrade for a 750,000 gallon per day extended aeration wastewater treatment facility to an A/O biological facility.  Assistance included acquiring State CWSRF planning grants and USDA Rural Development grant for extensive improvements including separation of combined sewer/stormwater collection systems (CSO), advanced Class A sludge treatment, and reconstruction of original 1970’s treatment facility to new Anoxic/Oxic Treatment System.  Total grant funds were $7,275,000.

Water Treatment Facility, Water Mains, and River Crossing Horizontal Directional Drilling

directional-drillingTata & Howard provided design and construction services for the construction of a 1.44 mgd water treatment facility.  The water treatment facility consists of a concrete block masonry building housing filtration equipment, a laboratory and office space, and associated piping, instrumentation and controls. Building components including HVAC, plumbing, and electrical services were incorporated in the facility. Other work included, but is not necessarily limited to, site work, exterior piping systems, and electrical work at an existing well pump station.

rock-drill-rigTata & Howard also provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 5,000 linear feet of new 12-inch high-density polyethylene (HDPE) water main (two parallel pipes at 2,500 linear feet, each) via directional drilling beneath the Pemigewasset River, connecting the City’s Franklin Falls Well Site and the City’s Acme Well Site.

Tata & Howard provided design and construction services for the installation of approximately 2,655 linear feet of 12-inch diameter Class 52 ductile iron water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Hill Road (New Hampshire Route 3A) and a service road connecting Hill Road to the City’s Acme Well site; approximately 4,000 linear feet of 12-inch water main, water services, and associated valves, fittings, and hydrants on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street; approximately 3,200 linear feet along Lawndale Avenue; 1,200 linear feet along Webster Lake Road; and 600 linear feet along Kimball Street.  The work also included pavement restoration on Lawndale Avenue, Webster Lake Road, and Kimball Street.

The project was funded by NHDES and the USDA Rural Development office.

FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant in MA

FEMA grant
The exposed water main ran under the bridge on Mechanic Street

Water Main Relocation Project in Monson, MA Received FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant for 75% of Project Cost

Tata & Howard provided engineering consulting services to the Town of Monson, Massachusetts for the relocation of the 8-inch diameter water main on Mechanic Street.

The main was originally constructed in 1897 under the streambed; however, after 117 years in this location, the decrease in surface water elevation had exposed the water main. The water level averaged about one inch below the top of pipe, exposing the top portion of the entire section of main that crossed the brook, approximately 15 linear feet of main. Exposure of the water main made it susceptible to freezing during the winter months, which could have resulted in a break and subsequent lost water or contamination from the brook to the Town’s entire water system, potentially resulting in significant costs to residents and to repair, clean, and disinfect the system. The main provides potable water to approximately fifty residents. There were only two gate valves located at the ends of Mechanic Street. As a result, if the main were to fail at the bridge, the entire street would have to be shut down in order to repair the damage, disrupting water service for the 50 serviced residents. The Mechanic Street Bridge has a history of failure. As a result of a major flood event in 1955, the bridge failed and was completely replaced in 1956. The bridge ran directly over the water main, which posed an additional threat to the main should the failure reoccur. Although the main was unaffected during the previous failure, its weakened condition made it more susceptible to failure in a similar event.

Tata & Howard provided funding assistance and the project qualified for and received a FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant for 75% of the cost of the project. The work included the preparation of design plans and specifications for the relocation of the 8-inch water main to a self-supporting beam structure attached to the bridge abutments on Mechanic Street. The project also included bidding, permitting, construction administration, and resident observation.

Water System Improvements and Funding Assistance, VT

150K-gal-storage-tank-and-houseGreensboro Fire District No. 1 (GFD#1), situated on the Northern portion of the Green Mountains in Vermont, requested assistance with their water distribution and treatment systems due to deficiencies identified in a sanitary survey conducted by the State of Vermont. This contract addresses these deficiencies and provides the District a more robust covered water storage tank, secure buildings that house controls and chemicals and related equipment, emergency power generation, and water metering.

As part of the project, Tata & Howard helped GFD#1 secure funding that included a 45% USDA Grant for the originally planned project with an estimated budget of $2,900,000. During the design phase, the District lost their primary well source due to an extended drought. Tata & Howard engineers worked with the District to secure a 100% USDA grant for the cost of constructing a new municipal well source and associated emergency generator and related appurtenances.

Tata & Howard provided design, construction administration, and resident observation for the water system improvements project. Construction began in the spring of 2015 with the setup of a temporary water storage system and demolition of the existing water storage tank roof structure. Precast planks and a ballasted membrane roof were then installed, providing safe, quality water. Two new small buildings were constructed to house chemicals and water well piping and controls, along with an emergency generator to provide continuous water in case of interruption to electrical power.

CHALLENGE: Critical Wastewater Treatment Facility Upgrade Needed, Limited Funds Available

Wastewater treatment plant that serves the Towns of Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH
Wastewater treatment facility that serves the Towns of Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH

CLIENT: The Towns of Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH

PROJECT: Shared Wastewater Treatment Facility

THE CHALLENGE: The existing wastewater treatment facility was 40 years old, costly to operate, and did not meet state and federal water quality standards. In addition, the Towns had very limited funds with which to upgrade the treatment facility.

THE SOLUTION: Tata & Howard helped the Towns secure a $2.412 million low-interest, long-term loan and $1.69 million in grant funds from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development in order to build the new facility.

Tata & Howard, Inc. provided complete consulting engineering services for the construction of the wastewater treatment facility project which included the complete upgrade of four pump stations as well as the upgraded 0.185 mgd, 3-cell lagoon wastewater treatment facility. In addition, Tata & Howard’s St. Johnsbury, Vermont office, formerly Leach Engineering Consultants, provided full design services for all of the upgrades. The Towns now enjoy a state-of-the-art, reliable wastewater treatment facility that meets the Effluent Discharge limits to the Connecticut River and provides for a more efficient treatment process. The new influent screening and grit removal processes extend the life of the treatment facility components. In addition, septage receiving provides for additional income and also provides service to the residents of the Towns that are not on public sewer. The design included numerous energy-efficient features such as variable-frequency drives (VFDs) on aeration blowers, solar-powered lagoon mixers, a wood pellet boiler for heat, energy-efficient windows, and insulated concrete form (ICF) walls, resulting in a reduction in annual operation and maintenance costs. The pump stations were upgraded to eliminate operators entering below grade structures and to allow for future pump replacement that would be lower cost with it would be with the original centrifugal pumps.

PROGRESS: The project is complete, and the Towns celebrated the completion of their shared $4.12 million wastewater treatment facility with a ribbon-cutting ceremony in Canaan, VT.

CHALLENGE: Prioritizing Water System Improvements with Limited Resources, Mountainaire, AZ

Mountainaire mapCLIENT: Ponderosa Utility Corporation, Arizona

PROJECT: Mountainaire asset management based water distribution system study to assist with prioritizing water system improvements

THE CHALLENGE: Mountainaire is a small water distribution system with limited manpower and revenue resources, and the operation and maintenance of the system is often reactive rather than proactive.

THE SOLUTION:
We successfully helped secure WIFA funding for the completion of the study which provides guidance to the PUC on how the system operates, what improvements are needed for efficient operation and continued maintenance of the system, and a prioritized approach to assist in funding and implementation of projects. This asset management based water distribution system study addresses undersized deteriorating water mains, above grade assets, and the energy efficiency of the pumping system. The study evaluates the system as a whole, based on above grade and below grade assets. Above grade assets are evaluated based on remaining useful life expectancy. Water mains are based on hydraulic capacity, criticality, and risk of failure. A hydraulic model was created for the study.

PROGRESS: Using the findings of the study, we are currently providing engineering services to evaluate flow and pressure requirements for the existing Kiowa Site booster pump station in order to construct a constant pressure pumping system to replace the existing booster pump and hydropnematic tank system that is old and failing.

Water Mains, DWSRF, Uxbridge, MA

Department of Public Works, Uxbridge, MA

Water_Mains_Construction hatsTata & Howard is assisting the Town of Uxbridge with the design of 18,200 linear feet of 12-inch diameter water main on Route 122 from the Blackstone River to the Northbridge Town boundary.  Work includes the preparation of design plans and specifications, permitting with the local Conservation Commission, MESA, and MassDOT, and the preparation of the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) application, plans, and specifications checklist for the Route 122 water main design.

In addition, Tata & Howard provided design, permitting, and construction administration services for approximately 4,750 and 1,560 linear feet of 20-inch and 12-inch diameter water main, respectively, on Quaker Highway.

District Water Treatment Facility, Transmission Mains, and Metering Station, Mattapoisett, MA

Mattapoisett River Valley Water District (MRVWD), MA

MRVWD_water treatment facilityThe MRVWD water treatment facility project was designed to treat water from eight wells belonging to the Towns of Fairhaven, Marion and Mattapoisett.  The MRVWD facilities also include approximately 5 miles of raw water transmission mains between the wells and the water treatment facility, finished water transmission mains from the water treatment facility to the existing town transmission mains, six new 100 HP high lift pumps and control/metering stations.  The existing pump stations were upgraded to pump water to the water treatment facility but operation of the pump stations will remain the responsibility of the individual towns.  The total cost of all project components was approximately $16.5 million, which was partially funded with a low interest SRF loan.  By constructing a regional facility, the towns were able to save over $4.9 million in design and construction costs in comparison to individual treatment facilities.