New Hampton Road Water Main Project

New Hampton Road Water Main Project

Tata & Howard recently completed design, funding, and construction phase services in the City of Franklin, NH for the $3.5M New Hampton Road Water Main Project. The new 16-inch and 12-inch ductile iron water mains replaced a 1940’s era unlined cast iron water main (approximately 14,000 linear feet) with a history of main breaks and extends over three (3) miles from the Babbitt Road Booster Station to the Sanbornton Wellfield.

The water main was identified as a priority in the 2016 Capital Efficiency Plan prepared by Tata & Howard and will provide improved water quality, distribution pressure, and fire protection.

Tata & Howard assisted the City with maximizing the NHDES SRF Loan with the City’s paving program funds to fully reconstruct 9,000 linear feet of New Hampton Road as part of the project.

Park Construction Company of Fitzwilliam, NH was the General Contractor for the project which was initiated in March and completed on time in November of 2020 following all recommended Covid-19 protocols.

East Mountain Road Water Storage Tank- Westfield, MA

East Mountain Road Water Storage Tank- Westfield, MA

Tata & Howard was contracted to provide design, bidding services, construction administration, and resident observation for the new water storage tank on East Mountain Road in Westfield, MA. The project included subconsultant work for the development of a survey, borings work, geotechnical evaluation and report, and environmental services to prepare a Habitat Assessment and MESA Checklist.

The design phase of the project consisted of:

  • Development of a site plan showing the proposed 2.1 MG precast, pre-stressed, wire-wound concrete tank location
  • New 16-inch diameter water main
  • Removal of the existing 16-inch AC water main
  • Access road improvements.

The new tank and access road required a Stormwater Management Permit to be filed with the City Engineering Department. Permits were filed with MassDEP, FAA, and MESA.

The construction administration phase consisted of:

  • Attending progress meetings with the client
  • Providing consultation on construction matters
  • Contracting with a qualified biologist to develop and supervise implementation of the Rare Vertebrate Protection Plan
  • Review and approval of shop drawings, schedules, and other data
  • Final observations of project
  • Finished set of record drawings

The resident project representative phase included the services of a part-time Resident Project Representative at the site to assist in the observation of the work.

The precast concrete tank, constructed by DN Tanks, is made of multiple concrete panels that were cast on site and lifted into place by a crane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new 2.1 mg tank will replace the city’s original 2.7 mg tank and is now online.

 

Newton, MA – Lead Service Replacement Program

Newton, MA – Lead Service Replacement Program

Tata & Howard was contracted to provide design, construction administration and resident project representation for the replacement of 588 lead services in Newton, MA.
Although the water that services the City is not corrosive, replacing lead services is a cautious and preventative measure to avoid lead from potentially leaching into tap water via the service connection which is located from the water main to the meter.
Lead pipes are more likely to be found in older cities and homes built before 1986. As such, the affected lead services in Newton were installed between 1875 and 1915.
Of the 588 total services;

  • 318 were full-service replacements (from water main to meter)
  • 266 were partial-service replacements (from curb stop to meter)
  • 4 were street only replacements (from water main to curb stop)

Prior to the construction phase of this project, Newton residents were notified about the City’s Lead Service Replacement Program (LSRP). Although not required, those wishing to participate in the program were able to take advantage of a ten-year, no interest payment plan through the City.
Under the LSRP, the City replaced, at its own expense, the portion of the water service pipe which was within the public way from the street line in front of the homeowner’s property, to the City water main. The homeowner then had the option to replace the portion of the water service pipe that ran from their meter to the property line.
Tata & Howard scheduled construction and coordinated with the residents who elected to participate in the LSRP. Crews from C.J.P & Sons Construction worked to excavate the properties and remove/replace the water service pipes. In most cases, limited excavation of homeowner property was needed.
When the project reached completion, 427 total services had been replaced.
Lead service replacement program in Newton, MA. Excavator and men.
Lead service replacement program in Newton, MA. Newton home with construction cones.
Lead service replacement program in Newton, MA. Excavator and men. Construction worker replacing pipes.
Lead service replacement program in Newton, MA. Sidewalk closed sign,

(De)leading the Way – Marlborough, MA

(De)leading the Way – Marlborough, MA

The City of Marlborough, MA (home of T&H headquarters) contracted Tata & Howard for the design, pre-construction services, construction administration and resident observation of approximately 1,200 lead water service connections.
Until 1944, lead was widely used in service lines and is quite common in many of the older cities and towns in Massachusetts.
Lead pipes currently placed between the streets and homes of identified Marlborough residents will be replaced with copper pipes in five phases – each phase consisting of approximately 250 homes.
Tata & Howard will be involved in each phase, reviewing tie cards, attending field surveys to determine what each service placement will entail, and advising contractors on the quantity of pipes to be installed in each location.
Although lead is known to be  a major health risk to children and pregnant women, the supplier of Marlborough’s water, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA), treats all water to reduce lead from getting into drinking water.
   
   

Falmouth Main Street Water Main Construction

Falmouth Main Street Water Main Construction

Tata & Howard was contracted to provide design, construction administration and resident observation for the installation of 18,000 linear feet (approximately 3.5 miles) of 16-inch ductile iron water main in Falmouth, MA. Water main replacement will be in Main Street and Route 28. That is, from the intersection of West Main Street and Locust Street, to the intersection of Teaticket Highway and Oxbow Road.
New water main will be replacing the town’s 10-inch cast iron water pipes that were originally installed in 1898. Falmouth’s 121-year-old water infrastructure has stood strong for more than a century; however, it has become clear that it’s nearing the end of its useful life and approaching the age at which it needs to be replaced. Evidence of this can be seen in the three water main breaks that have occurred since August of 2018. In addition, the original water main is hydraulically deficient and needs to be up-sized to meet the increasing demands in the system.
Construction began at the beginning of April and continued up until Memorial Day of this year. Construction was placed on hold during the heavy tourist months in Cape Cod and will resume after Labor Day. Project completion is expected in 2021.



Hemlocks Raw Water Pumping Station

Aquarion Water Company Pump Station Improvements

Hemlocks Pumps
BEFORE improvements to the Hemlocks Pumping Station.

Tata & Howard provided engineering services for design, bidding, construction administration, and resident observation to Aquarion Water Company for improvements to their existing Hemlocks Raw Water Pumping Station in Fairfield, CT. The project included refurbishing five 300 hp centrifugal pumps and motors, replacing the existing variable frequency drives (VFDs), installing new piping, check valves, and strainers for each pump.

As this facility is a source of supply for Aquarion’s Main System, it needed to be kept operational throughout the construction. The sequence of work required a single pump to be taken off line; refurbished; reinstalled with new piping, VFD, and appurtenances; tested and placed back into service prior to the next pump being taken off line.

Hemlock Pumps
AFTER improvements to the Hemlocks Pumping Station.

Another important aspect of the project was to replace the existing strainers so that they were easier for the plant operators to clean as they get clogged with eels. To simplify maintenance, new stainless steel wye strainers with bottom access to the screens were installed on the suction side of each pump.

Chamberlain Highway Receives New Water Main Connections

Chamberlain Highway Receives New Water Main Connections

The Chamberlain Highway in Meridan, Connecticut has 536 linear feet of new 16-inch ductile iron main and two new fire hydrants. After Tata & Howard completed several test pits to verify connection locations at each end of the new main, construction work started on May 3, 2018 with the installation of a 16” x 16” tapping sleeve and valve at the north end of the project. This existing water main at the north end connection was originally installed in 1894.

Chamberlain West MainWork progressed south until the new main was approximately 50 feet away from the other connection point in West Main Street. Connections to the existing main in West Main Street was performed over a 36-hour period due to the complexity and amount of utilities around the service connection, including a live 24-inch water main five feet away and multiple telephone conduits located 6 inches above the replaced main. Tata & Howard personnel on site at all times to observe that work was in performed in accordance to the plans and specifications.

Following the completion of the Chamberlain Highway water infrastructure improvement project, work to replace two water mains on the state-owned bridge crossing Sodom Brook in Meridan will begin.

A Decade of Infrastructure Improvements

Wiscasset Completes Capital Efficiency Plan™ Infrastructure Improvements

The Wiscasset Water District (WWD) completed its final phase of water main replacements for the Town of Wiscasset, ME. In 2007, Wiscasset, a rural coastal town in Maine, embarked on a long-awaited infrastructure improvement program to replace the Town’s century-old waterlines. The Wiscasset Water District, engaged Tata & Howard’s services in 2010, to prepare a Capital Efficiency Plan™ (CEP), to identify areas to the Town’s water distribution system needing rehabilitation, repair, and/or replacement.

CEP reportThe Capital Efficiency Plan™ report which included hydraulic modeling, system criticality, and an asset management plan, provided the Utility with a database and Geographic Information System (GIS) representation for each pipe segment within their underground piping system. The CEP report also prioritized the water distribution system piping improvements and provided estimated costs to replace or rehabilitate the water mains.

Wiscasset Main StreetIn response to the CEP™ findings, the Wiscasset Water District retained the services of Tata & Howard, to perform design, bidding, construction administration, and resident project representation services for a series of water main projects.

Phased over 10 years, the plan included replacing 33,150 feet of 12-inch and 8-inch piping, installation of a water storage tank mixer, SCADA upgrades, and office landscaping improvements.

The final phase of water main replacements is scheduled to be completed during the summer of 2018 and will fulfill all the Priority I water main improvements identified in the 2010 CEP™ report. The projects were funded in part by a combination of USDA Rural Development grants (6 total) and loans (7 total), as well as coordination with the Maine Department of Transportation and Rural Development.

With the water main improvements nearing completion, the Wiscasset Water District has retained Tata & Howard to reevaluate its 2010 Capital Efficiency Plan™. The revised plan will update the water main inventory database and review additional recommended water distribution improvements.

Trinity Avenue Pump Station, Grafton, MA

Trinity Avenue Pump Station, Grafton, MA

Tata & Howard is providing engineering services to the Grafton Water District for the Trinity Avenue Pump Station at the Trinity Avenue Wellfield. The project included permitting, design, and bidding of the pump station as well as providing assistance with permitting, design, and reporting to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) for the proposed Trinity Avenue Well site.  The property was owned by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (DFW).  The Grafton Water District swapped land with the DFW to obtain ownership and control of the Trinity Avenue site.  Test wells were installed and short term pump tests were completed on each of the wells.  Based on the results of the tests, it was recommended to install a three well configuration of 18 inch x 12 inch gravel packed wells resulting in approximately 800 gallons per minute (gpm).  The project included an evaluation of alternatives for the access road including installation of a bridge or an open bottomed culvert, and T&H assisted with the preparation of permanent easements for the installation of utilities and roadway to the well site. In addition, T&H prepared and submitted an NOI to the Grafton Conservation Commission. Design included double wythe block and interior concrete painted block with wood truss roof and asphaltic shingles; and security included chain link fence, gates, locks, intrusion alarms, and lighting. T&H also assisted with the coordination of the installation of three phase power to site. Chemical feed at the station includes KOH for pH adjustment and chlorine gas for disinfection. Standby power was included in an outdoor enclosure. The design also included a 24-inch transmission main for 4-log removal. Currently, T&H is providing construction administration and resident observation services.

 

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Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH Energy Efficient Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades

Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH Energy Efficient Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades

The Towns of Canaan, Vermont and Stewartstown, New Hampshire operate a shared wastewater treatment facility, which required significant upgrades. The existing facilities were 40 years old and although a few upgrades were performed in the 90s, the facilities were not performing well, did not meet Life Safety codes, and required significant maintenance. The upgrade met all of the goals of the Client by providing for simple operation and maintenance requirements, meeting the Life Safety codes, eliminating confined spaces, lowering of electrical power costs, and meeting discharge parameters through production of high quality effluent. The solutions developed for the upgrade to this facility were also economical.

Control building insulated concrete forms

One of the primary elements of the design was the consideration of the economics of energy reduction.  The design incorporated insulated concrete form construction for the building walls with R-49 insulation rating in the ceilings.  The design also included a wood pellet boiler with a pellet silo and hot water heating system, which allowed for reduction of explosion proof heaters in the headworks building.  All of the windows were low-E and highly insulated, and an outer glassed-in entry way increased the solar gain retention of the building and reduced heat loss.  The process headworks and operations buildings were constructed as single story structures, increasing operator safety.  The lagoon aeration system is now a fine bubble, highly efficient process with additional mixing provided by solar powered mixers that help reduce aeration requirements, improve treatment, and allows for the addition of septage, all at no cost due to solar power.  The pump station upgrades were designed to eliminate daily confined space entry by the operator by the conversion to submersible pumps.  For sludge removal, a unique and simple “Sludge Sled” system was incorporated, which allows the operators to easily remove the sludge at their convenience. Sludge treatment is accomplished with a geo-bag system that allows the sludge to be freeze dried, reducing the volume by almost 50% with no energy consumption. The influent pump station was designed with three pumps instead of the normal two-pump system in order to meet both present and future design flows, allow for lower horsepower pumps, improve flexibility, reduce replacement costs, and reduce energy costs.   The other four deep dry pit pump stations were converted to wet wells and submersible pumps, eliminating confined spaces, and are equipped with emergency generators, eliminating the need for operator attention when power is lost.

Solar mixers for lagoons

The incorporation of highly energy efficient building components resulted in reducing annual operation and maintenance costs, which resulted in lower user rates and a more sustainable facility.  All building components are virtually maintenance free.  All of the equipment and processes were selected to reduce both annual and future replacement costs.

The treatment system is a 3-cell aerated lagoon system, and the solar powered mixers were installed to enable reduction of the aeration needs and horsepower during the summer months when septage is added.  The aeration blowers, which are housed in insulated enclosures, reduce noise and were sized to allow for the addition of septage to the lagoons, which is not common in Vermont.  The aeration blowers are controlled with Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs), which allow for greater operator control of aeration and provide energy cost savings. The operation is simple and safe for operators and others who need to maintain the facility and equipment.  The design has provided flexibility to the operators and has resulted in an energy efficient, sustainable solution for this community.


 

 

Read the whitepaper here.

 

 

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