Trinity Avenue Pump Station, Grafton, MA

Tata & Howard is providing engineering services to the Grafton Water District for the Trinity Avenue Pump Station at the Trinity Avenue Wellfield. The project included permitting, design, and bidding of the pump station as well as providing assistance with permitting, design, and reporting to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) for the proposed Trinity Avenue Well site.  The property was owned by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (DFW).  The Grafton Water District swapped land with the DFW to obtain ownership and control of the Trinity Avenue site.  Test wells were installed and short term pump tests were completed on each of the wells.  Based on the results of the tests, it was recommended to install a three well configuration of 18 inch x 12 inch gravel packed wells resulting in approximately 800 gallons per minute (gpm).  The project included an evaluation of alternatives for the access road including installation of a bridge or an open bottomed culvert, and T&H assisted with the preparation of permanent easements for the installation of utilities and roadway to the well site. In addition, T&H prepared and submitted an NOI to the Grafton Conservation Commission. Design included double wythe block and interior concrete painted block with wood truss roof and asphaltic shingles; and security included chain link fence, gates, locks, intrusion alarms, and lighting. T&H also assisted with the coordination of the installation of three phase power to site. Chemical feed at the station includes KOH for pH adjustment and chlorine gas for disinfection. Standby power was included in an outdoor enclosure. The design also included a 24-inch transmission main for 4-log removal. Currently, T&H is providing construction administration and resident observation services.

 

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Interceptor Sewer, Danbury, CT

interceptor_sewer
Jacking a 48-inch steel casing under I-84 in Danbury, CT

The Oakland Avenue sanitary sewer project consists of jacking a 48-inch steel casing pipe through the Interstate-84 embankment in Danbury, CT and installing a new 24-inch sanitary sewer to replace the existing 16-inch sewer that is undersized. The project will alleviate the restriction that is causing sewer overflows. Services included surveys and mapping, review of easements, review and updating of original design, preparation of plans and specifications, bidding, construction administration, and resident observation. Construction is currently underway and the project is expected to be completed by the end of this October. The new sewer line installation will complete an interceptor project that was constructed in 1994.

FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant in MA

FEMA grant
The exposed water main ran under the bridge on Mechanic Street

Water Main Relocation Project in Monson, MA Received FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant for 75% of Project Cost

Tata & Howard provided engineering consulting services to the Town of Monson, Massachusetts for the relocation of the 8-inch diameter water main on Mechanic Street.

The main was originally constructed in 1897 under the streambed; however, after 117 years in this location, the decrease in surface water elevation had exposed the water main. The water level averaged about one inch below the top of pipe, exposing the top portion of the entire section of main that crossed the brook, approximately 15 linear feet of main. Exposure of the water main made it susceptible to freezing during the winter months, which could have resulted in a break and subsequent lost water or contamination from the brook to the Town’s entire water system, potentially resulting in significant costs to residents and to repair, clean, and disinfect the system. The main provides potable water to approximately fifty residents. There were only two gate valves located at the ends of Mechanic Street. As a result, if the main were to fail at the bridge, the entire street would have to be shut down in order to repair the damage, disrupting water service for the 50 serviced residents. The Mechanic Street Bridge has a history of failure. As a result of a major flood event in 1955, the bridge failed and was completely replaced in 1956. The bridge ran directly over the water main, which posed an additional threat to the main should the failure reoccur. Although the main was unaffected during the previous failure, its weakened condition made it more susceptible to failure in a similar event.

Tata & Howard provided funding assistance and the project qualified for and received a FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant for 75% of the cost of the project. The work included the preparation of design plans and specifications for the relocation of the 8-inch water main to a self-supporting beam structure attached to the bridge abutments on Mechanic Street. The project also included bidding, permitting, construction administration, and resident observation.

Water Treatment Plant, Iron and Manganese Removal, Wayland, MA

Wayland, MA

WaylandMA_BaldwinWTP_aerial2Tata & Howard completed pilot testing, design, permitting, bidding, and construction management services for the Town of Wayland’s Baldwin Pond Water Treatment Plant which included iron and manganese removal. The facility received MassDEP approval to go online and became Wayland’s first public building to receive an occupancy permit in the last 30 years. The need for the facility arose from high iron and manganese content in Wayland’s water. The facility also addressed any concern over the three Baldwin Pond wells which were under close scrutiny to determine if they were “under the influence of surface water.” The 7,500-square-foot, 1.5 million gallons per day, state-of-the-art water treatment facility was constructed to meet current and future regulations for many years ahead. The design included ozone oxidation, ultrafiltration membranes, waste recycle, and chemical feed for coagulation, pH adjustment, fluoridation, and disinfection. The treatment facility utilizes ozone oxidation and ultrafiltration to remove iron and manganese from the blended raw water from the three water supply wells.  Although other constituents are also removed through this process, the basis of this plant is to optimize the removal of iron and manganese.

The Baldwin Pond Water Treatment Facility project was highly successful through good communication and teamwork between Tata & Howard’s construction management team, the general contractor Methuen Construction, and the Town of Wayland. With less than 1% of the contingency budget applied to change orders towards the end of the project, the Town was able to do additional work. The additional work included replacing raw water mains and upgrading the existing garage onsite. A dedication ceremony for the facility was held with Representative Scott Brown, and representatives from MassDEP, Methuen Construction, and Tata & Howard joining the Town of Wayland in commemorating the completion of the facility.

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Water Mains, DWSRF, Uxbridge, MA

Department of Public Works, Uxbridge, MA

Water_Mains_Construction hatsTata & Howard is assisting the Town of Uxbridge with the design of 18,200 linear feet of 12-inch diameter water main on Route 122 from the Blackstone River to the Northbridge Town boundary.  Work includes the preparation of design plans and specifications, permitting with the local Conservation Commission, MESA, and MassDOT, and the preparation of the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) application, plans, and specifications checklist for the Route 122 water main design.

In addition, Tata & Howard provided design, permitting, and construction administration services for approximately 4,750 and 1,560 linear feet of 20-inch and 12-inch diameter water main, respectively, on Quaker Highway.

Water Treatment Facility, Falmouth, MA

Falmouth, MA

Falmouth_Crooked_Pond_Water treatment facilityTata & Howard completed the design of a 3.6 mgd water treatment facility which utilizes air stripping and pressure filtration technology for the removal of iron, manganese and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The facility includes an air stripping tower, three greensand filtration units, horizontal carbon contactors, chemical storage and feed facilities, gravel pack supply well, finished water storage, and backwash holding tanks.

On-Call Water Engineering Services, Franklin, NH

City of Franklin Municipal Services Department, Franklin, NH

FranklinNH_water treatment facilityTata & Howard has been assisting the City of Franklin, New Hampshire with general water engineering services since 2009. The Tata & Howard team has managed several phases of work, including the design and construction of the water treatment plant and distribution system improvements.

The first phase was the design and construction of 2,500 linear feet of water main on Hill Road to connect a new water treatment plant to the City’s distribution system.  This project also involved use of four bioretention systems to treat and manage stormwater from the roadway, and was constructed in 2010.

The second phase of our work with the City included the design and construction of two parallel 2,500 LF sections of 12-inch diameter HDPE crossings beneath the Pemigewasset River using horizontal directional drilling to transport water from the City’s Franklin Falls Well to the water treatment plant site.

Tata & Howard managed the survey and geophysical studies and prepared a Preliminary Design Report and Environmental Review documents for several phases of work.  The City’s wells are surrounded by lands controlled by the US Army Corps of Engineers, which required that we complete an extensive permitting process to secure permissions for the final design of the project.

Tata & Howard completed design, construction, permitting, and funding applications for a 1,000 gallons per minute groundwater treatment plant to remove iron and manganese from three of the City’s wells. The plant has four pressure filters containing Greensand Plus media and using sodium hypochlorite for oxidation and sodium carbonate (soda ash) for pH adjustment. This plant went online July 9, 2012.

Tata & Howard provided design services for the construction of a new prestressed concrete tank at the site of an existing tank. The existing tank was in poor condition and due to the site characteristics, it was determined that construction of the new tank on the existing foundation of the old tank would be the best option.  A second tank on the site was demolished in 2013 and a new prestressed concrete tank will be constructed in its place.

Tata & Howard also conducted a full water system analysis for the City of Franklin, New Hampshire by utilizing our proprietary Capital Efficiency Plan™ methodology.  Our CEP involved creating a model of all water infrastructure in the City including sources, pump stations, treatment facilities, storage facilities, transmission, and distribution lines. Using our GIS modeling software, the system was calibrated based on fire flows in an attempt to accurately replicate the existing system. We then pinpointed deficiencies within the system based on a custom rating scale given to multiple criteria such as age, break history, material type, criticality and size. Recommendations were made for improvements in order of need. The study renewed both above ground and below ground assets. Funding for this study was in part from an Asset Management Planning Grant from NHDES.

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Water Storage Tank, Booster Pump Station, New Water Main, and Distribution System Upgrades, Spencer, MA

Town of Spencer, MA

SpencerMA water mainTata & Howard is currently providing construction administration services for a new 0.5 million gallon cast-in-place concrete water storage tank, booster pump station, approximately 12,600 linear feet of new 12-inch diameter water main, and miscellaneous distribution system upgrades. Construction of in-line isolation valves, removal of existing pressure-reducing valve (PRV) vaults, a new system wide SCADA system and new high lift pumps at the water treatment facility and well site were also included in Tata & Howard’s design. The purpose of this project is to separate the current single zone system into two pressure zones as required by an Administrative Consent Order from the MassDEP.

The creation of a two pressure zone system requires the replacement of the existing 200 horsepower (hp) pump at the Meadow Road Water Treatment Facility and 150 hp pump at the Cranberry Brook Well with lower head, high efficiency pumps and motors. The Meadow Road facility is the Town’s primary water supply source; therefore, changing of this pump requires coordination with the Department of Utilities and Facilities and the overall two pressure zone project construction sequencing to minimize the time this source is off-line.

Tata & Howard also verified the Town’s hydraulic model, which was used to select the best location for the new tank and select water main size for transmission and fire protection.  The model was also used to determine the boundary line between the two pressure zones.  A Capital Efficiency Plan™ is currently being prepared.  Assistance will be provided, as needed, for public education of the project and during Town meetings.  This project is being funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Massachusetts State Revolving Fund (SRF).  Due to an aggressive schedule required under the funding requirements, all design; permitting associated with planning, zoning, and wetlands; and project bidding were completed and approved within a six-month period.

Water Distribution System Study and Capital Efficiency Plans™

Aquarion Water Company
Areas of service: Oxford, Millbury, Hingham and Hull, MA and Hampton, NH

Aquarion_SuttonAve_Water_TankTata & Howard has been providing general engineering services to the Aquarion Water Company in Massachusetts and New Hampshire for the last five years.  Our work has included the design of water mains and storage tanks, new source development, replacement well designs, hydraulic studies and Capital Efficiency Plans™.  We have completed or are currently completing Capital Efficiency Plans™ for each of the systems in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.  Within the two states, Aquarion Water Company operates a total of approximately 430 miles of water main.  Completion of the Capital Efficiency Plans™ has provided Aquarion with a basis for improvements throughout each of the systems.  The analysis not only reviewed hydraulic considerations but included a detailed analysis of assets and critical components.  By utilizing this approach, Aquarion Water Company was able to spend money effectively on upgrades to the system.  For example, as part of a hydraulic evaluation, it was recommended that Aquarion replace the water main on Mill Road to meet fire flow requirements in the eastern part of the system.  After consideration of the age, material and break history of the surrounding water mains, it was determined that from a capital efficiency standpoint, replacement of the water main on Pine Road would benefit Aquarion more than replacement of the water main on Mill Road.  The water main on Pine Road had reportedly experienced numerous breaks and would eventually require replacement in the near future.  Installation of the water main on Pine Road allowed the Aquarion Water Company to meet the needed fire flow requirement, eliminate a problematic water main, and reduce the overall capital cost.  All the studies included an analysis of the existing supplies versus the estimated future demands as well as storage capacity.  The Hingham/Hull Water Distribution System Study included an analysis of potential water supply sources.  Tata & Howard evaluated the potential of connecting to MWRA, buying water from Cohasset and drilling new wells within the Town.  All options included potential costs for engineering, permitting and construction.

Tata & Howard completed a storage evaluation for the Hingham and Hull water systems.  The purpose of the evaluation was to determine if the Strawberry Hill Tank was needed.  Following a tank inspection, the tank was determined to be structurally deficient and needed substantial work to improve the integrity of the elevated tank.  The Strawberry Hill Tank had a capacity of 0.51 million gallons and had an overflow elevation that was approximately 20 feet lower than the Turkey Hill Tank located in the same service area.  The water in the Strawberry Hill Tank did not fluctuate and caused concern for contaminated water.  Based on a storage evaluation and hydraulic analysis, it was determined that the Strawberry Hill Tank was not needed.  The Aquarion Water Company subsequently removed the tank from the system.

Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades, Lyndon, VT

Lyndon_VTTata & Howard provided evaluation, planning, funding assistance, design, and construction phase engineering services for an upgrade to the 30-year old 0.750 MGD Extended Aeration Activated Sludge Treatment facility including conversion to Anoxic/Oxic activated sludge process to allow more operations’ flexibility, reduce construction and annual O&M costs, and prepare for potential for nutrient removal.  Improvements consisted of the construction of four anoxic basins and four oxic basins, replacement of clarifiers, addition of five blowers, new electrical and control building, new heating system, new influent pumps, headworks influent screen followed by grit removal, centrifuge for sludge dewatering and post sludge dry storage building for the Class A Sludge. The project was funded by a USDA Rural Development loan and grant.