Worcester, Massachusetts Hydraulic Modeling Services and Capital Efficiency Plan™

Tata & Howard completed a hydraulic model update and Capital Efficiency Plan™ for the City of Worcester. As part of the project, Tata & Howard updated and verified the City’s existing hydraulic model, which has over 550 miles of water main.  Work included three days of fire flow tests throughout the City and allocation of demands using up-to-date billing and parcel data.  Phase II of the project, the Capital Efficiency Plan™, identified and prioritized areas for improvement within the distribution system.  Our services included evaluating the condition of the existing distribution system infrastructure to determine the adequacy of meeting present and future demands, calculating needed storage requirements, assessing and prioritizing system improvements, reviewing and evaluating typical fire flows throughout the system, creating a pipe asset management rating system, and recommending improvements to the distribution system.

Tata & Howard calibrated the hydraulic model under extended period simulation for an evaluation of the Super High Service Area with the Chester Street Tank off-line due to rehabilitation.  The configuration of the service area included two distinct zones.  The Chester Street Tank is located in one area and the Howland Hill and Apricot Tanks are located in the other area.  To remove the Chester Street Tank from service, an evaluation of supply and pressures needed to be completed.  The results of the analysis included running both zones off the Apricot Tank and utilizing the Chester Street Pump Station to maintain pressures within the vicinity of the Chester Street Tank.

Water Distribution System Evaluation and Tank Design, Paxton, MA

Town of Paxton, MA

The new tank was completed in 2015
The new tank was completed in 2016.

Tata & Howard provided engineering services for a comprehensive water distribution system evaluation and study. The work included development of a hydraulic model using WaterCad software. The plan included fire flow tests, review of the water supply agreement with the City of Worcester, preparation of projected water demands based on historical use and population trends, and evaluation of storage. The plan also included an evaluation of potential water supply sources within Town boundaries.

This project included an evaluation of the system prior to design of the tank to determine the best solution.  Work included calibrating the model under extended period simulation (EPS).  The hydraulic model was used to determine the best hydraulic gradeline elevation of the system to reduce the storage surplus.  Additionally, the model was used to track the chlorine residual from the Worcester Pump Station to the extremities.  Jar testing was completed to determine the chlorine demand in the water supply while water quality testing results assisted with determining the chlorine demand in the piping system.  The model was used to simulate the chlorine degradation.  Improvements were input into the hydraulic model and the effects on the chlorine residual in the extremities reported.  Improvements such as an elevated tank at Maple Street with a total usable volume, reduction in hydraulic gradeline elevation, and cleaning and lining water mains were evaluated.  The analysis determined that a new tank at Maple Street is necessary based on water quality and cost.

Tata & Howard provided assistance with the preparation and submittal of a Project Evaluation Form to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for the construction of a new elevated tank with a capacity of 0.2 million gallons. The new tank reduced the water age in the system by replacing the deteriorating ground level tank. Tata & Howard provided construction administration and resident observation services for the new tank, which was completed in 2016.


Whitepaper:

ABSTRACT: In 2012, the Town of Paxton, MA was experiencing significantly reduced chlorine residuals in the extremities of the system along with an aging water tank that required extensive rehabilitation. As a result, the Paxton Department of Public Works (DPW) determined the need to create an extended period simulation (EPS) hydraulic model to evaluate the water age and water quality in the distribution system. The study examined the residual chlorine concentrations and water age throughout the distribution system and presented various options to help mitigate these issues, including replacing the aging tank and adding a chlorine booster pump station at the existing site. Construction of the new tank and pump station was completed in the summer of 2016.  Read the complete whitepaper by clicking below:

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Water Storage Tank Replacement, Hamden, CT

Whitney Wintergreen tank completed
Tata & Howard provided evaluation, design, construction administration, and resident observation services to the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority (SCCRWA) for the replacement of the Whitney-Wintergreen water storage tank. The project included an analysis of SCCRWA’s Whitney-Wintergreen service area to determine the appropriate volume of storage needed to serve its customers, and a 1 million gallon concrete tank was constructed to replace the existing 1.5 million gallon steel tank at the same site. The project also included demolition of the existing tank as well as stormwater management at the site. The project was completed in September of 2015.

 

Water System Upgrades including Manganese Removal, Montgomery, VT

Montgomery Water System, Montgomery, VT

Tata & Howard designed and constructed the improvements to eliminate low and inadequate system pressures, construct a new source, pilot test filtration for manganese removal, design and construct required distribution system piping to connect the plant and storage tank with the system, design a new concrete storage tank, booster pump stations, and the filtration facility for manganese removal.  The  project was very successful and remains in great condition today.

Water System Improvements and Funding Assistance, VT

150K-gal-storage-tank-and-houseGreensboro Fire District No. 1 (GFD#1), situated on the Northern portion of the Green Mountains in Vermont, requested assistance with their water distribution and treatment systems due to deficiencies identified in a sanitary survey conducted by the State of Vermont. This contract addresses these deficiencies and provides the District a more robust covered water storage tank, secure buildings that house controls and chemicals and related equipment, emergency power generation, and water metering.

As part of the project, Tata & Howard helped GFD#1 secure funding that included a 45% USDA Grant for the originally planned project with an estimated budget of $2,900,000. During the design phase, the District lost their primary well source due to an extended drought. Tata & Howard engineers worked with the District to secure a 100% USDA grant for the cost of constructing a new municipal well source and associated emergency generator and related appurtenances.

Tata & Howard provided design, construction administration, and resident observation for the water system improvements project. Construction began in the spring of 2015 with the setup of a temporary water storage system and demolition of the existing water storage tank roof structure. Precast planks and a ballasted membrane roof were then installed, providing safe, quality water. Two new small buildings were constructed to house chemicals and water well piping and controls, along with an emergency generator to provide continuous water in case of interruption to electrical power.

Great Hill Water Tank Construction, Marion, Massachusetts

This project included construction of a 1.0 million gallon, precast, pre-stressed, wire wound, concrete water storage tank in Marion, Massachusetts, with associated piping and appurtenances, a Tideflex mixing system, and site work. Other work included the decommissioning and demolition of the existing 2.0 million gallon pre-stressed concrete water storage tank at the project site. All work was completed ahead of the August 30, 2015 deadline.

Prepared tank sub-grade
Prepared tank sub-grade
Completed leveling base for tank
Completed leveling base for tank
Tank floor/footing reinforcing steel and seismic cables prior to concrete pour
Tank floor/footing reinforcing steel and seismic cables prior to concrete pour
Completed tank floor/footing
Completed tank floor/footing
Finished tank
Finished tank

CHALLENGE: Mission Critical Storage Tanks, Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, New Orleans, LA

hospital new orleans
State-of-the-art SLVHCS in New Orleans, LA, is on track for silver LEED certification

CLIENT: NBBJ, Columbus, Ohio

PROJECT: Mission critical storage tank systems for Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System (SLVHCS)

THE CHALLENGE: SLVHCS is the successor to the VA Medical Center, which was decimated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The new hospital requirements included green building practices and resiliency during natural disasters, including the ability to remain operational for at least five days with enough provisions and accommodations for up to 1,000 staff and patients in case of a major disaster.

The atrium of Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System
The atrium of SLVHCS

THE SOLUTION: Tata & Howard provided design and construction administration services on specific components of the mission critical storage tanks, which include a domestic water tank, sewage holding tank, cooling tower process and bleed water tank, and fire protection water tank. Our design of specific components of the mission critical tanks included coating, waterproofing, mixing, pumping, bacteria control, odor control, venting, piping to five feet outside the tanks, and instrumentation and control. Specific design elements for resiliency and green design included the following:

  • Domestic Water Tank system instrumentation/controls include storage tank level measurement and control of inlet/outlet valves. The system also includes ultraviolet disinfection of all potable water pumped from the storage tank into the hospital.
  • Sewage Holding Tank is waterproof and its control system to provide automated response to an event using electrically actuated valves that direct the sewage from the gravity system to the holding tank. After the event, the system will turn the pumps on and transfer the sewage to the City’s system. A water spray system will automatically wash down the empty tank.
  • Cooling Tower Make-up Water Tank is waterproof and its control system design provides electrically actuated valves to receive rainwater from the building roof drains, condensate from the buildings, and potable water from the City’s water system. The Cooling Tower Make-up system instrumentation/controls include tank level measurement and control of inlet/outlet valves.
  • Cooling Tower Bleedwater Tank is waterproof and its control systems design provides electrically actuated valves to accept water from the cooling towers, recycles water to the cooling towers, and pumps it into the municipal sewer system. The Cooling Tower Bleedwater Tank system instrumentation/controls will include tank level measurement and control of inlet/outlet valves.
  • Fire Protection Water Tank is waterproof and its control system design provides electrically actuated valves to automate control of receipt of water from the CEP/Warehouse roof drains and the City’s water system.
  • The instrumentation and controls for all of the above elements are capable of communicating with the facility ‘s SCADA system.

PROGRESS: The new state-of-the-art facility opened on August 1, 2015, and the building is on track to receive LEED silver certification. For comprehensive information on the new hospital, please click here.

CHALLENGE: Water Storage Tank Painting, Cleaning in Residential Setting

Chester Street 0.5 million gallon water storage tank in Worcester, MA

CLIENT: City of Worcester, Massachusetts

PROJECT: Chester Street 0.5 million gallon water storage tank painting, cleaning, and rehabilitation

THE CHALLENGE: The Chester Street water storage tank required evaluation, repair, cleaning, and painting of both the interior and the exterior. The tank is located in a heavily populated residential neighborhood and the exterior surface had high levels of lead in the paint. Therefore, special attention to lead contamination, noise, and construction debris was required. In addition, determination of the effects of taking the tank offline were required before any work could be started.

THE SOLUTION:  Analysis of the Super High Service Area using the verified hydraulic model was conducted, and the model was run under extended period simulation (EPS) to evaluate the potential pressure problems within the service area. As a result, operational modifications to the existing pump stations and service zones were recommended. Working only during daylight hours while keeping noise and debris to a bare minimum, construction crews completed miscellaneous repairs including replacing the anchor bolts, installation of overflow support brackets, modification of the access ladder, modification of the roof ladder, repair of the upper level sway rod, extension of the balcony handrail, installation of a roof handrail, and replacement of the roof finial vent. During the exterior abrasive cleaning, a containment system was utilized to prevent lead from getting into the air and soil. Once all repairs and cleaning were completed, the interior and exterior of the elevated tank were painted.

PROGRESS: Two years later, the tank is still in pristine condition, as shown in the photo above.

8.4 mgd Water Treatment Plant Design, Permitting, Construction Administration, Falmouth, MA

 

DAF water treatment plantTHE CHALLENGE: More stringent USEPA and MassDEP regulations, including Stage 2 Disinfectants/Disinfection-by-Product Rule (S2 D/DBPR) and the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR), resulted in the Town of Falmouth needing to make a decision on whether to construct a filtration facility in compliance with the SWTR or to upgrade disinfection processes only at the existing Long Pond Water Treatment Facility (LPWTF) to maintain the existing Filtration Waiver.

THE SOLUTION: Because the existing LPWTF utilized no filtration to remove bacteria, organics, and particulates, the water quality entering the distribution system was an ongoing concern with elevated turbidity and organics leading to seasonal color, taste, and odor complaints; elevated bacteria and concentrations; and elevated algae counts. In addition, the high doses of chlorine needed to maintain the disinfection residuals required for an unfiltered supply reacted with the organics in the raw water to form disinfection by-products. Therefore, the only viable option for the Town of Falmouth was a new water treatment plant. After evaluating 22 treatment processes and developing eight treatment alternatives for pilot testing, only one treatment process met all goals: Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) clarification, intermediate ozone followed by filtration. This alternative also scored favorably on the benefit/cost analysis.

Tata & Howard provided design and construction services for the new Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) facility with a design capacity of 8.4 million gallons per day (mgd) for the Long Pond surface water supply for the Town of Falmouth, MA. The water treatment plant (WTP) utilizes coagulation, mixing, flocculation, dissolved air flotation (DAF), dual media filtration including granular activated carbon (GAC) above sand, chemical feed systems, and an intermediate ozone feed. Building components include HVAC, plumbing, fire sprinkler, gas and electrical services. Other work included site work with exterior piping systems, exterior above and below ground tanks, sludge holding lagoons, construction of a garage, new raw water intake and pump station, directional drilling of raw water mains, and demolition of equipment and site piping at the existing water treatment facility.

As part of the project, Tata & Howard provided design and permitting of a new 8.4 mgd intake and raw water pump station (RWPS) for the WTP.  The new intake and RWPS were constructed along the eastern shore of Long Pond and replaces the existing intake and Low Lift Pump Station.  The new intake and RWPS includes a two-level intake consisting of two 8.4 mgd rated intake screens installed at elevations -3 feet below mean sea level (MSL) and -13 feet below MSL.  The 36-inch HDPE intake pipeline connects the intake screens to the new RWPS located approximately 150 feet from the eastern shore of Long Pond.  An air burst system was designed in the RWPS to provide a means for routine cleaning of the new intake screens.

An accelerated 11 month design and permitting schedule, followed by contractor prequalification, bidding, and award, were completed in time to qualify the Town for >$3M in principal forgiveness.

Design included the following:
• 300 Drawings
• 1,200 pages of Specifications
• SRF PEF application
• Monthly project meetings
• Coordination with Building Department
• Coordination with Board of Health
• Coordination with Town IT Department
• Coordination with Police and Fire Departments
• Coordination with Gas and Electric Utilities

Permits included the following:
• Wetlands Protection Act-Local Conservation Commission
• Board of Health
• Remediation General Permit (NPDES)
• Massachusetts General Permit
• Environmental Notification Form
• Massachusetts Historical Commission: Intensive Archaeological Survey including 200 test holes
• MassDEP Approval to Construct WTP: BRP WS 24
• DWSRF PAC
• 401 Water Quality Certification
• NHESP – Turtle Protection Plan
• Chapter 91 Waterways License
• U.S. Army Corps of Engineers General Permit

The construction of the Long Pond Water Treatment Plant progressed on schedule and was completed in 2017.  dji_0051The plant included numerous sustainability and energy efficiency initiatives including the following:

  • Recycling spent backwash water to head of plant and back into the treatment process, after it passes through a plate settler to remove solids.
  • Recycling laboratory analyzer and filter influent piping gallery analyzer discharges back into the treatment process.
  • Using filter-to-waste water after a filter backwash sequence as supply water for the next backwash, instead of using finished water for backwashing.
  • Discharging cleaner supernatant water off the top of the lined lagoons to an unlined infiltration lagoon and back into the ground to minimize residuals.
  • Use of local/native plants for landscaping, including an irrigation system using collected rainwater from roof drainage.
  • Interior and exterior LED lighting fixtures.
  • Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on HVAC equipment and process equipment motors.

The plant went online on October 18, 2017. The work was funded under the SRF program. The Long Pond Water Treatment Plant received an ENR New England 2017 Best Project Award in the Water/Environment category, and an Associated Builders & Contractors of Massachusetts Eagle Award in the Public Works – Environmental category. For a drone video of the new water treatment plant taken by the general contractor, Methuen Construction, please see below:

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Standpipe Rehabilitation, University of Southern Maine

University of Southern Maine, Gorham, ME

USM standpipe rehabilitationTata & Howard provided engineering services to the University of Southern Maine related to the interior and exterior rehabilitation of a welded steel water storage tank. The standpipe was constructed in the 1950’s and is approximately 30 feet in diameter and 105 feet tall with a capacity of 0.55 million gallons. The scope of services included preparing Contract Documents for the cleaning, interior abrasive blasting, exterior pressure washing, and interior and exterior coating application. The project also included coordination with two cellular companies and incorporation of corresponding design considerations into the Contract Documents. Additional design considerations included providing the USM logo on the tank exterior, repairing foundation cracks and gaps, extending the overflow pipe and installing a flapper, screen, and concrete splash pad, providing safety climb system for exterior access ladder, replacing the roof vent, and installing a new roof access hatch. Tata & Howard provided bid assistance, construction administration services, and full time construction observation. Since the standpipe is located on a college campus, the time frame for completion was limited to summer break, but the standpipe rehabilitation project was completed within budget and on schedule.