Employee Spotlight: Robert Sims

Employee Spotlight #4 – Robert Sims

We are delighted to shine our employee spotlight on Robert Sims. Southerner by birth, Robert was  born in Kentucky and raised in Austin, TX before relocating to Massachusetts 35 years ago. Having a long line of engineers/surveyors in his family, including an ancestor who performed the survey of record for the Common in Cambridge, MA in the 17th century, he knew from a young age that he wanted a career in the field.

He attended the University of Texas at Austin with initial sights on Electrical Engineering, but quickly changed to Civil Engineering after hearing a presentation from the Dean of the UT Cockrell School of Engineering.

With more than thirty years of design and construction project management experience under his belt, Robert joined Tata & Howard in 2018 as a PM. He has most enjoyed working on two water quality studies for the towns of South Deerfield and Mattapoisett, as he was able to form a great working relationship with his team and clients, and produced solid reports with PF’s above 3.

Around the office, Robert is known for his friendly personality, fascinating hobbies, and amusing stories. He enjoys woodworking, beekeeping, fantasy football, and gardening. To stay active, he participates in stair climb races for the American Lung Association, the Scottish Highland Games, and the occasional 5k race.

Robert is passionate about his Scottish heritage and can often be seen wearing his kilt. In fact, he sat in the X-wing fighter from Star Wars…while wearing a kilt, and flew in a WWII vintage P-51 fighter…while wearing a kilt.

Thanks for all you do, Robert!

Employee Spotlight: Christine Beliveau

Employee Spotlight #3 – Christine Beliveau

We are excited to shine this week’s employee spotlight on Chrissie Beliveau. Chrissie has been with Tata & Howard for more than ten years and serves as the company’s Marketing Coordinator. Wearing many hats, Chrissie assists in all request for proposals/qualifications, and a variety of marketing tasks, including tradeshow planning, collateral design, advertising, and more.

In her free time she enjoys mountain biking, hiking, traveling, and spending time with her two grandchildren, Max and Luna, and her soon-to-be-born twin grandchildren. In addition, Chrissie has started experimenting with stained glass, and is looking forward to taking classes to further expand her knowledge in the art.

Her most memorable travel experience was a family trip she took to Italy, where she traveled from Milan to Rome. Exploring her true Italian roots from her father who was born and raised in the mountains of Parma (where parmesan cheese was created) – the trip provided a special opportunity to visit relatives and view pieces of her natural heritage.

Chrissie’s favorite part about working for Tata & Howard is having the opportunity to work with each team member. She truly loves being a part of the team and enjoys working with all levels and personalities, while learning more about engineering in the water industry.

Thanks for all you do, Chrissie!

Employee Spotlight: Peter Goodwin

Employee Spotlight #2 – Peter Goodwin

Today we are shining our employee spotlight on Peter Goodwin. Peter joined Tata & Howard as an Associate in the fall of 2019 and has enjoyed his time thus far helping clients to solve problems successfully.

With Civil Engineering degrees from the University of Maine – Orono and Northeastern University, Peter’s passion for infrastructure planning, design, construction, and system operation/maintenance has spanned across nearly four decades and four firms/organizations. Peter is Past-President of the New Hampshire Water Pollution Control Association along with being State Director for the Maine Water Environment Association (2012-2015).  He is involved in several NEWEA, NHWWA, NHWPCA, MWUA, and MEWEA committees and has developed many professional relationships through the experience.

Since joining T&H, Peter’s favorite project has been the construction of the New Hampton Road Water Main Improvements for the City of Franklin, NH. While challenges presented themselves in the face of a pandemic, it was great to see the project completed under budget with two miles of additional roadway reconstruction negotiated with the general contractor and NHDES SRF Program.

When he’s not completing water, sewer, stormwater, and environmental consulting projects, Peter enjoys golfing, playing hockey, skiing and traveling. Some of his favorite trips include a post college cross-country trek in a conversion van with his best friend that allowed for visiting family and touring National Parks, as well as skiing in Austria, and exploring Italy.

Thank you for all you do, Peter!

Peter Goodwin joins Tata & Howard as new Office Manager in Salem, NH

Peter Goodwin joins Tata & Howard as new Office Manager in Salem, NH

SALEM, N.H. (PRWEB) OCTOBER 22, 2019

Tata & Howard, Inc., a Northeast leader in water engineering consulting, is pleased to welcome Peter Goodwin to the firm. Peter joins us as the new Office/Project Manager in the Salem, New Hampshire office. In this role, Goodwin will manage the Salem office while working directly with clients and a team of design engineers in a variety of civil engineering projects including pipelines, pump stations, and water/wastewater treatment facilities.

He has 35 years of municipal engineering consulting experience and is known in the industry for his strong business development experience with demonstrated success in company growth and expansion. His professional experience includes a wide range of water, wastewater, stormwater, and environmental engineering projects, including planning, design, permitting, construction administration, operations, and funding assistance. Goodwin’s most recent experience has been associated with cutting edge technologies in asset management and trenchless rehabilitation/replacement of aging infrastructure.

“Peter’s extensive experience in project management and client services will be instrumental in the continued growth of our firm,” said Paul B. Howard, P.E., Senior Vice President and Co-Founder. “We are looking forward to his contributions and are excited to welcome him to the team.”

A graduate of Northeastern University, Goodwin holds a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and has been active in several state and regional professional associations. He is a current Board Member for the New Hampshire Public Works Association (NHPWA) as well as the Committee Chair for the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA)-Veterans Workforce Development Committee. He is also a Past-President (2015) of the New Hampshire Water Pollution Control Association (NHWPCA) and former State Director for the Maine Water Environment Association (MEWEA).

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Founded in 1992, Tata & Howard, Inc. is a 100% employee-owned water, wastewater, stormwater, and environmental services consulting engineering firm dedicated to consistently delivering innovative, cost-effective solutions in the water environment. Tata & Howard has gained a solid reputation as an industry leader in the Northeast by bringing knowledge, integrity, and dedicated service to all-sized markets, both public and private. The firm has offices in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.tataandhoward.com.

Click here to view full press release.

Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH Shared Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements Whitepaper

wastewater treatment facility improvements whitepaperCanaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH Shared Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements Whitepaper

Abstract: The Towns of Canaan, Vermont and Stewartstown, New Hampshire operate a shared wastewater treatment facility, which required significant upgrades. The existing facilities were 40 years old and although a few upgrades were performed in the 90s, the facilities were not performing well, did not meet Life Safety codes, and required significant maintenance. The economical upgrade met all of the goals of the Client by providing for simple operation and maintenance requirements, meeting the Life Safety codes, eliminating confined spaces, lowering of electrical power costs, and meeting discharge parameters through production of high quality effluent.


Canaan, VT and Stewartstown, NH Shared Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements Whitepaper Request

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Water Distribution Systems in New England

Introduction

first-gummed-stamp-america
On July 1, 1847, Brattleboro postmaster Frederick Palmer had the idea of putting adhesive on the back of stamps, and so he produced and sold the first gummed postage stamp in America, now known as the 1847 Brattleboro Postmaster’s Provisional stamp.

New England is one of the oldest and most historically rich areas of the nation. Famous events such as the pilgrims founding Plimouth Plantation and Paul Revere’s midnight ride took place in Massachusetts. New Hampshire planted the first potato in America, Maine introduced the nation’s first sawmill, and Vermont produced the nation’s first gummed postage stamp. Connecticut has the most “firsts” of any state in the nation including the first newspaper, submarine, and hamburger, while tiny but mighty Rhode Island was the first colony in the nation to declare independence from Britain. New England also boasts another first: it is home to the nation’s first water distribution systems.

A Brief History

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Wooden pipe and fire plug from colonial Boston on display at the Waterworks Museum, Boston, MA.

Boston, Massachusetts became home to the nation’s first waterworks in 1652. Distribution pipes at that time were made of wood, constructed from bored-out logs from the area’s plentiful hemlock and elm trees and attached together with pitch, tar, or iron hoops. While this rudimentary distribution system did supply some of the area’s residents, it was mainly used for fire protection as homes during that time — constructed of wood and heated with fireplaces —were particularly prone to fire.

wooden-pipes-new-england-chart

It was over a century before other New England cities began installing wooden distribution pipes. Providence, Rhode Island, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Worcester, Massachusetts all laid wooden pipes during the late 1700s, and several other cities followed suit in the early 1800s. Contrary to some urban myths, wooden pipes are not still in use in any areas of New England today. The high pressure from modern water systems would instantly split any existing wooden pipes. Wooden pipes that are occasionally unearthed during some construction projects were disconnected years ago.

iron-pipes-new-engljand-chart

Wooden pipes were problematic for many reasons including warping and sagging, insect infestation, rotting, taste issues, and splitting. As iron became increasingly available during the early 1800s, cities began installing iron pipes. The first iron pipes in New England were installed in Portland, Maine in 1812, followed by Montpelier, Vermont in 1820, and in both instances the pipes were lead. Many other cities followed suit throughout the 19th century, utilizing wrought iron, cast iron, and lead pipe. In the 1950s, ductile iron piping was introduced and boasted the longevity of cast iron with the addition of increased strength, flexibility, and safety. It became widely used in the 1970s and it is still the material of choice throughout New England today.

Distribution Systems Today

water-main-break
Destruction caused by a water main break. Photo copyright Erin Nekervis

New England can be considered a pioneer of our nation’s water infrastructure. After all, distribution systems have grown from a few wooden pipes in Boston to the intricate, complicated underground infrastructure that we enjoy today. However, because much of the area’s infrastructure was laid so long ago, it has reached the end of its useful life. Water main breaks occur daily and are not only inconvenient to customers, they can also be dangerous, as evidenced by the November 2016 water main break in Boston, Massachusetts that caused manhole fires and forced evacuation of the area. Maintaining and updating our distribution systems is critical to the health and safety of our nation, its people, and the economy. But with limited budgets and resources, where do we start?

water-main-install
Tata & Howard provided design, bidding, and construction administration for a water main replacement in Milford, Massachusetts, identified in a Capital Efficiency Plan.

Strategically prioritizing improvements is imperative to today’s water systems, as the rehabilitation and replacement of our nation’s buried infrastructure is an ongoing task. Asset management provides a roadmap for utilities, allowing them to maximize their limited infrastructure dollars by planning for the replacement of critical infrastructure over time. Tata & Howard’s Capital Efficiency Plan™ (CEP) methodology takes it one step further by combining the concepts of asset management, hydraulic modeling, and system criticality into a single comprehensive report. The final report provides utilities with a database and Geographic Information System (GIS) representation for each pipe segment within their underground piping system, prioritizes water distribution system piping improvements, and provides estimated costs for water main replacement and rehabilitation.

elevated-water-tank
Tata & Howard provided water system distribution evaluation as well as design, bidding, and construction administration for a water tank replacement project in Paxton, MA. 

Since the firm’s inception in 1992, Tata & Howard has remained a niche firm with deep experience and expertise in the water environment, and has provided CEP and hydraulic modeling services for countless municipalities throughout New England. Tata & Howard has one of the largest pipe asset management databases of any consulting engineering firm in New England. In fact, we have data on over 5,000 miles of New England pipe, providing utilities with critical information about their systems such as condition and probability of failure of certain pipe cohorts.

In Conclusion

Water distribution systems have come a long way since the days of hollowed out logs providing fire protection to colonial Bostonians. The underground network of distribution pipes has grown astronomically and now incorporates safer, stronger, and more cost-effective materials. As distribution systems are updated and expanded, it is critical that accurate, up-to-date information is available to water systems so that they may invest their limited capital wisely.

USEPA has released the 2013 Draft New Hampshire MS4 Permit

On February 12, 2013, the USEPA published the 2013 Draft New Hampshire MS4 Permit in the Federal Register, and updated  its website for this permit:

https://www.epa.gov/region1/npdes/stormwater/MS4_2013_NH.html#2008DraftNewHampshireSmallMS4Permit

The agency also posted a Fact Sheet that includes responses to comments it received on the 2008 Draft New Hampshire MS4 Permit.

The public comment period for the 2013 Draft NH MS4 Permit is from February 12, 2013 to 11:59 pm April 15, 2013.  A public hearing is set for Thursday, March 14 2-5 PM in Portsmouth.  Tata & Howard will attend the public hearing, and will provide comments to USEPA.  Please contact us at (207) 518-9500 with questions about this permit, or for assistance in determining the impact of this proposed permit on your community.